21 May 2011

Travellers

Some blogposts are easy to write. Others are hard. My last post was hard. It was touching on something I had kept buried from others for years. Thank you to Jenny, the author of "Demob Happy Teacher", for letting me know that my post reminded her of a famous poem by Robert Frost written in 1916. I can see how and why she made that connection and I give you Frost's poem now in its entirety. To me it is clearly not about someone at a road junction in "a yellow wood", it is all about the repercussions of our decisions and the paths we choose to take through life. I wonder what you think dear reader...
Robert Frost 1874 -1963

* * *

The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveller, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I marked the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less travelled by,
And that has made all the difference.

4 comments:

  1. delving into your psychi is hard sometimes

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  2. I love "The Road Not Taken" even though many people call it "The Road Less Travelled"....

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  3. JOHN Indeed it is. Many of us build walls around the most troublesome zones.
    RHYMES With the other title the poem might seem to have a very different slant.

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  4. I always think of it as both the road less travelled and the one not taken. For what it's worth, I read it as someone who chooses the less conventional path rather than the easy option. But I may be wrong!

    ReplyDelete

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