25 February 2012

Thirteen

Shirley found a book in our copious but disorderly bookshelves. It was probably given to me as a present but I have no memory of receiving it. It is an Ordnance Survey Pathfinder Guide and it's called "White Peak Walks". Normally when I go out into the Peak District which borders Sheffield's western and southern suburbs, I tread country paths I have followed before or I work out circular routes from one of my own maps. More recently I have used an Ordnance Survey internet site to print off A4 maps of planned walks.

However, flicking through the new guide book, I spotted several circular walks that I have not tackled before - mostly in the far south or the far west of the national park. Needing exercise and with a pleasant afternoon weather forecast, I set off yesterday to try one of the closer walks  - Walk Thirteen - "Beeley and Hob Hurst's House" - an area that lies immediately south of the Duke of Devonshire's famous Chatsworth Estate and is less than half an hour's drive from our illustrious city - a true jewel in England's crown (MI5 please note!)

I parked up but before setting off on my hike I sat under a yew tree next to St Anne's - the fourteenth century parish church - to eat a ham sandwich and drink coffee from a thermos flask. Snowdrops were everywhere. I set off up the fields to Beeley Top and then onwards to Park Farm and Bunker's Hill Plantation. Then up to Hob Hurst's House - a remote early Bronze Age burial site. Back down to Beeley Plantation, passing an even older stone circle, and onwards to the hamlet of Fallinge before dropping down through Burnt Wood and back to Beeley... Six and a half miles and three hours - just as the book said but it would have been quicker if I hadn't stopped to take photos:-
Beeley from Burnt Wood
Old guide stoop near Hob Hurst's House
Towards Fallinge 
"Lunky" or Sheep  Hole near Beeley 
Old barn above Beeley

10 comments:

  1. Did your guide by chance explain the derivation of the name Bunker's Hill? We have a place locally with the same name and I have often wondered where it came from.

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  2. SHOOTING PARROTS Surely it's from the Boer War. At Hull City's old ground the main terracing also used to be called Bunker's Hill. (Not joking!)

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  3. Looks as though the weather was lovely for striding out!

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  4. Isn't Bunker's Hill a famous battle in Boston USA from the War of Independence?

    I imagine you could live some sort of 18/19th century existence in the High Peak if you wanted.

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  5. Isn't Bunker's Hill a famous battle in Boston USA from the War of Independence?

    I imagine you could live some sort of 18/19th century existence in the High Peak if you wanted.

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  6. Perhaps the name does originate from the battle during the siege of Boston in 1775. There certainly seems to be quite a lot of Bunker's Hills in the UK.

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  7. I bow to Professor Booth's superior historical knowledge but why did he have to rub it in by posting the same comment twice?

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  8. I think the Peak District is one of the prettiest areas in the whole of England. How lucky are you to live close by. We spent 2 weeks exploring the area near Matlock and even managed a few walks (even one in the grounds of the lovely Chatsworth)when the Hawthornes and wild garlic were flowering -delightful. I don't think there is anywhere else in the world that has the walking opportunities that you have in England (probably the whole of the UK). I'm feeling a real yearning to return, just wish the world's Stock Markets would oblige !!
    I'll just have to go along with your walks so please keep stopping along the way for photos.
    Cheers

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  9. What a lovely way to spend time...I am jealous. One day when I retire I will be suggesting you set up a little walking group and I will join you...or is it the solitary nature of the day that adds to its appeal? Lovely photos.

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  10. HELEN So glad you have known and enjoyed parts of our lovely Peak District. There are many, many Londoners and English southerners who have never been up to this neck of the woods. When you return we shall get ajar of "Vegemite" in specially.
    LIBBY I do like to walk at my own pace and soak up whatever I see (hopefully NOT rain!). As a man it's easier to walk alone. Sometimes Shirley comes with me but has often complained that I walk too fast. There are many walking groups based in and around Sheffield. They frequently announce weekend walking plans and meeting points in the local paper.

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