7 February 2017

Draft

In 1970, I moved to Beverley Grammar School to begin my A level studies. My subjects were English, Geography and Art. My art teacher was known universally as TAD for those were his initials - Mr T.A.Doyle.

Very early on, he instructed me and my classmates to design and paint a new book cover for "Around the World in Eighty Days". I had the simple idea of a biplane pulling a banner around the globe and on that banner the name of the book would be spelt out.

I worked diligently on my initial painting and after two double lessons proudly presented my effort to Mr Doyle. He looked over the rim of his silver framed spectacles, silently perusing what I had done and then looked up at me saying, "That's a very good rough draft Neil."

For a moment I was flabbergasted. But I took my work back to my bench, rolled up my sleeves and started anew. Rough draft! Rough draft? A week later I had produced a much more careful version of my design and this time Mr Doyle approved of it. His initial judgement had spurred me on to achieve a better standard and this was clear to see when placing the first effort alongside the second attempt.

Last week I made a blogpost about pheasants and two of my American blogging friends - Donna (aka Mama Thyme/Mama Bear/ Big Sis) in Colorado and Jennifer in Florence, South Carolina challenged me to have a go at painting a pheasant picture based on one of my photos. This was the photo I chose:-
Last evening, using a mixture of watercolour crayons and paint, I produced this:-
But it's only a rough draft, not the finished picture. After all, Mr Doyle is still watching me.

37 comments:

  1. That's really wonderful!

    and I like TAD's way of spurring you on :)

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    1. Better than being caned on the buttocks.

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  2. A very good rough draft Mr Pudding.

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    1. Thank you Mrs Doyle. I shall return to my bench.

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  3. Excellent! Better than my finished product could ever be!

    Thanks for enlisting in the campaign to prevent rubber band pollution! (Who calls them elastic bands, if not the British? I swear I've heard people say that here. Canadians say it too.)

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    1. UpNorth where the real English dwell, we call them rubber bands.

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  4. And I'm sure the eagle-eye of TAD, who I expect was very pleasant, is looking kindly down upon your pheasant.

    Well done. :)

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    1. The more I look at pictures of pheasants and pheasant heads the more I realise how intricate and beautiful their feathers are. Thanks Lee.

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  5. You've done a wonderful job. Soon you'll be able to leave the camera at home and take only your paper and pencil,we'd love to see more of your art. Plus you'll see everything differently,your walks will take on a new meaning.

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    1. You are very kind Wenda. I am happy to work from photos. They stay still and you don't get wind and rain when you are painting.

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    2. I had not thought of that!

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  6. Your painting is surprisingly very good, well done.
    What is the evidence that makes people from the north of England "real English".

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    1. You can see just by looking and listening Derek. The southern English are fey and Frenchified with a few notable exceptions - yourself included. Are you sure your dad wasn't a Yorkshireman?

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    2. No, having researched my family tree we're all died in the wool southerners, both paternal and maternal. For the last 40 yrs I've also had Jack Russells, not whippets.

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    3. Jack Russells are intelligent and loyal but can be nasty little buggers. They say that dogs often taken after their owners.

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    4. Only can be though YP. I've never yet had a Jacko that was aggressive or noisy around humans. If you bring them up in the right way from a puppy they remain perfectly OK.

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    5. We have a very laid back Labrador who enjoys a good nap, and knowing that husband spends much of the day sleeping on the sofa, I can agree with the second part of your statement YP !

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    6. Is your husband called Rover or Fido?

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  7. That looks great! I can't believe it's only a first draft. I can't wait to see the final version. You definitely have talent!

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    1. It was nice to use the crayons again - you have more control.

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  8. I love it! If you paint a fox and I like it, I'll buy it and put it up in my flat. (I am serious.)

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    1. Good heavens! That is a challenge and a half Meike. I won't get on it right away so you might have to remind me. By the way, I wouldn't want any money for it. I might only have met you in Blogland but I think of you as a friend.

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  9. A wonderful likeness, Mr. Pudding. Lovely to see that you got all the colors the same with the crayons. Proud, that bird is!

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    1. If my body was decked in feathers like that I would also be exceedingly proud of my appearance.

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  10. I love this story and I think I would have liked your teacher. Did you?

    When the draft is this good, I can't wait to see the final version.

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    1. Yes I did like Mr Doyle. He was so passionate when teaching us about The History of European Architecture which we needed to cover for the one written paper element of the A level Art exams.

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  11. I like it as it is, YP.

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    1. Thanks CG but iIdo want to take it a step further.

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    2. By the way - you took the same three A Levels that I did !

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    3. Great minds think alike CG! What a co-incidence!

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  12. I wish I had half that talent when it comes to painting (unless it's walls and ceilings where I'm pretty competent).

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    1. Michelangelo was pretty good at ceilings too!

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  13. Your art is excellent .

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    1. I wouls say quite good Frances - that's all.

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  14. You learned a valuable lesson not only in art but in life. Of all the teachers I taught with , the one who impressed me most was Mr. A , the art teacher. I loved to watch him deal with kids.

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    1. Mr A had a very short surname Red.

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  15. All the kids called him Mr A and when they meet him today it's still Mr A. He has a fine German name and usually reads my blog.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.