16 March 2017

Daffodils

25 comments:

  1. Beautiful! Yellow is such a happy, happy colour! A lovely verse,too.

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    1. I wanted to make an entirely innocent, celebratory poem with no dark or serious undercurrents.

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  2. I love yellow and daffodils are a great source of it! Ours, unfortunately, are stifled in their trumpeting as they are still under four to six inches of ground, hugging their gowns around them.

    However, I hope to have my daffodil fix soon. The Canadian Cancer Society sells them as a fundraiser each spring and I've got two bouquets on the way (from Europe I believe). Lovely poem, YP.

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    1. Some things are worth waiting for aren't they Jenny?

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  3. these daffodils have put you in a very poetic mood. Nicely done.

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    1. Oh Red
      She said
      Let's go to bed
      We'll tarry a while
      In the garden shed.

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  4. For a moment I thought you'd be quoting Wordsworth, so it's a pleasure to read your poem YP. I always think that in nature yellow is the herald of Spring.

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    1. The only nod I deliberately made to Wordworth's great poem was selecting the word "fluttering" to start the seventh line.

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  5. Yellow is my favourite colour, so it is no surprise I really like "daffies", as Steve used to call them :-)

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    1. Are you sure he didn't call you Daffy?...Daffy Duck! By the way I started on the latest fox last night.

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  6. I went for many years without really seeing the daffodils come out because they were always over when I arrived in New Zealand and again when I arrived back in Scotland. So I really appreciate the daffodils again now.

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    1. Serves you right for being an international jetsetter Graham. Your carbon footprint must be as big as The Isle of Lewis.

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  7. “Where are the snowdrops?” said the sun.
    “Dead” said the frost, “Buried and lost, every one.”
    “A foolish answer,” said the sun
    “They did not die, asleep they lie, every one.
    And I will awake them, I the sun,
    Into the light, all clad in white, every one.”
    “It’s rather dark in the earth today”
    said one little bulb to its brother.
    “But I thought that I felt a sunbeam’s ray.
    We must strive and grow ’til we find our way”
    and they nestled close to each other.
    They struggled and strived by day and by night,
    ’til two little snowdrops in green and white
    rose out of the darkness and into the light;
    and softly kissed one another.
    By Annie Mattheson born March 1853 died 1924

    I discovered this poem a few years ago......for some reason it makes me want to cry!!

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    1. I like its joyfulness and its innocence. Like me Annie Mattheson has endowed the flowers/bulbs with human qualities. I believe this technique is called anthropomorphism. Thanks for sharing Frances.

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  8. And thank goodness! I love the yellow daffs at this time of year. Nice background color! I didn't know that was possible!

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    1. Oh, I see what you mean Steve. The poem was written as a Word document then in "Design" at the top I went to the right and changed the page colour before adding the daffodil picture from our garden. I also blurred the edges of the picture within Word...Format Picture I think.

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    2. I made a snip with the snipping tool and saved the whole thing as a picture.

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  9. Ps. I love your poem too.

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  10. Lovely poem, Mr. Pudding. And, I learned a new word and meaning....sward. So, thanks for that. You could thrill us once again if you would paint those yellow blooms. Wet on wet, maybe.

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    1. I am still on foxes Big Sis and hope to show you my latest one on this blog. After that I want to try a couple of landscapes. Daffodils are very hard to paint.

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  11. Why not combine both the fox and the daffodils? That way you could kill two birds with one stone. No doubt you could also work in a stone and two dead birds.

    It's absurdist art, where the artist sometimes sets a riddle for the viewer to solve when he/she looks at the painting. Not for the more conformist viewer of art, I think.

    Alphie

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    1. Good idea Alphie. The daffs and the fox will be in the foreground. Behind them a view of The Alps with two World War I planes in a dog fight in the sky plus God looking down from a big cumulus cloud.

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    2. You can't get away with omitting the stone and the two dead birds.

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  12. I love daffodils and seeing them flowering in England as I had heard all my life was such a thrill. Hope to return again one Spring.

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    1. Just for you I shall post some more daffodil pictures today.

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