5 August 2018

Notts

My brother Paul would have been 71 years old today. My father Philip would have been 104 years old. I still miss them even though it's eight years since Paul died and thirty nine years since Dad departed. In 1984, our Ian's due date was also August 5th but he hung on eight more days...
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Yesterday I was in Nottinghamshire. I drove out beyond Mansfield on the Newark road, bringing Silver Clint to rest in the charming village of Epperstone. When I strolled away on my planned walking route he was already chatting with a bronze-coloured Mini called Miss Foo-Foo. "No funny stuff Clint!" I called back over my shoulder.
The Lauels - house in Epperstone
How lovely was that rolling countryside and the day was becoming hot again. The fields were cracked and there was not a drop of water in Thurgarton Beck. Up to Bankfield Farm and then along the long straight track that leads to the village of Thurgarton. I saw a microlight landing on Bankfield's little airfield and then by Hill Farm I noticed a bench with a  little plaque on it. It read, ""IN MEMORY OF THE ANIMALS WHO SUFFERED ON THIS SITE FOR OUR BENEFIT". I was puzzled.
However, as I continued down the hill to Thurgarton I met a very old man with very long eyebrow hairs. They were clustering up against the windows of his spectacles like fronds in an aquarium. I asked him about the bench and he explained that there had once been an animal testing laboratory close by - run by the Boots pharmaceutical company. It had been shut down because of pressure from the Animal Liberation Front and growing public distaste for animal experimentation. We chatted for a while and after shaking hands we continued upon our divergent walks.
In Thurgarton there was a cricket match in progress but I had to press on and didn't even have time for a refreshing drink in "The Red Lion". The main aim of my journey was to spend a couple of hours in the nearby town of Southwell and the long walk was just a preliminary to that visit.
However, back in Epperstone, I finally submitted to my Saharan thirst and sank a pint of bitter shandy in "The Cross Keys". This welcome liquid descended so rapidly that it hardly had time to hit the sides of my gullet. I shall blog about Southwell tomorrow.

18 comments:

  1. Interesting....Cro posted today about how it would have been his father's birthday, too. I'm sorry that you lost your brother and father too young.

    I like the picture of the wheat field. Have a good day, Neil.

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    1. I am having a very lazy day after yesterday's exertions. Thanks for calling by again Jennifer.

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  2. I once stopped to look at a stall campaigning for animal rights. To this day I wish that I had not. The pictures were so graphic and I have not forgotten them, they are ingrained in my mind. I realise that I have probably benefitted from these experiments and so am probably a hypocrite but the animals go through such suffering for us.
    Like the idea of Clint chatting with a Mini. lol
    Briony
    x

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    1. Animal testing in relation to life-saving drugs is one thing but animal testing for shampoo, cosmetics etc. is quite another in my opinion.

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  3. Love the cricket pic. Quintessential England!

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    1. You are right. I wish I could have stuck around to watch that match.

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  4. I also like the cricket picture; you caught the action of each player!
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. I clicked just as the bowler was about to release the little red cannonball!

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  5. I like the first photo with its lone tree.

    Animal testing I can't even talk about. Or animals in slaughterhouses. And yet, I take my medication. I eat my protein. How hypocritical is that?

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    1. It is so hard to be true to ourselves when it comes to animals, recycling and the environment. To some extent we are all accidental hypocrites Jenny.

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  6. I am sorry for the loss of your brother and father but how nice for you to remember them in your blog on their birthdays. You have some beautiful pictures today.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words Bonnie.

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  7. Time doesn't diminish the loss we feel when loved ones pass. The missing remains with us, The years may pass by but, our feelings of loss remain solid.

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  8. Now the ultra lite in the last photo? what's going on?

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    1. That was at the tiny rural airfield near Bankwood Farm. The microlight was about to land.

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  9. A good way to remember your loved ones, walking on your own. I find that it always helps me.

    The wheat field is a great picture, really like a symbol for high summer. I also like the brick house, it reminds me of one I regularly pass when I am in Ripon.

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    1. Another photographer gave me the idea of a simple cornfield picture so I just tried a few. Glad you liked that one Meike.

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