1 May 2015

Peregrines

High on the tower of St George's Church, Sheffield a pair of peregrine falcons are feeding their young. Only two of the four eggs laid a few weeks ago have hatched. Time is running out for the other two even though the parent birds keep sitting on them hoping for the best. Last year all four eggs hatched and the greedy chicks all grew into fledglings.

The church is owned by The University of Sheffield. No religious congregations any more - just university students for the building is now used as a lecture theatre. Up at the falcons' nest box there are now two webcams and I cordially invite you to check what is happening by clicking here. This is reality TV that's actually worth watching if you can count patience amongst your virtues.

18 comments:

  1. Thanks for the link I'd forgotten about these.

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    1. With a big ladder you could get up there and take some macro shots Adrian.

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    1. I bet it reminds you of feeding Brett and Sally!

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  3. I love those birds!

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    1. You wouldn't if you were a pigeon Jennifer! That seems to be the peregrines' main food source.

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    2. Well, the world has an abundance of pigeons.

      Hey ho.

      (to borrow a phrase from John Gray!)

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    3. Hey ho? John Gray borrowed it from The Seven Dwarves!

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  4. You've been missing in action too long, Yorky! Did those peregrines birdnap you? They certainly are majestic birds...of good taste! ;)

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    1. Yes Lee. A giant peregrine falcon grabbed me in her talons and flew me up to her nest. There I managed to fight back by holding her down and plucking her before climbing down and returning home. Her squawking was deafening.

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    2. Oh, dear! The images going through my mind...you have no idea. You're going to have to hone up on your spelling, Yorky! lol

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  5. I remember you posting about the peregrines in Sheffield last year. I didn't know that it can happen for them to have a number of eggs of which only some hatch. Is there a chance for the other two eggs to hatch at all? And if they do, won't the new hatchlings be so small and weak compared to their older and stronger siblings, that these will take all the food their parents bring, and the younger ones will die?

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    1. Is that how it was with your sister Meike? She must be a tiny woman!
      I am sure your concerns are valid.

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    2. She is 14 months older and several clothes sizes bigger than me (and always was).

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  6. They are fascinating. They seem to have admirers everywhere too.

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    1. I could watch them for ages Graham. The parents are so patient and so attentive.

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  7. Thanks for the link Sir. The idea of wild birds coming to terms with civilisation (?) encroaching on their territory always cheers me.

    Ms Soup

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