18 November 2017

Zimbabwe

As I write this post, our television is showing live images of happy people in the streets of Harare, Zimbabwe. They feel they are on the threshold of a new era as they urge Robert Mugabe to do the right thing and go.

Undoubtedly, he played a big part in helping Zimbabwe to secure its independence but the past thirty seven years of his leadership have seen trying times of internecine struggle, economic incompetence,  malnutrition, graft, waste and intolerance. What was once the bread basket of Africa has become one of that great continent's basket cases.

At present, it does not appear that Mugabe has many supporters left who are prepared to fight for the continuation of his presidency. He has abused his power, amassing a huge personal fortune and the typical trappings of a multi-millionaire - while his people have suffered abysmally under his stewardship.

I am sure that we all hope that the next period of Zimbabwe's history will not be blighted by in-fighting and bloodshed. It would be so wonderful if the country could move peacefully to better times, underpinned by free and fair elections that create a new leadership  which seeks to help the ordinary people to make Zimbabwe successful again, leaving the Mugabe years behind. 

On this happy day, as Zimbabweans dance in the streets, I wish the whole country the best of luck as it steps forward into the bright unknown of the post-Mugabe years. I can hear a voice on the the radio singing: "There may be trouble ahead" but on this optimistic Saturday in the middle of November 2017 - Let freedom ring!
Enough is enough
Harare today.

23 comments:

  1. I haven't seen the most recent news but I am assuming there has been a military coup?
    I find it hard to imagine there will be anything but hardship in the face of such instability but Zimbabwe deserves to have at least a day or two of optimism and joy. I hope it is long lasting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for calling by and sharing your best wishes for Zimbabwe.

      Delete
  2. I hope the transition is a peaceful one...and that good fortune smiles generously on Zimbabwe and its people...today and long into the future.

    ReplyDelete
  3. After university one of my friends went to teach in Zimbabwe. She really enjoyed the time she spent there. At the time there was such hope for the future.

    I hope that the country and its people have that future now.

    Helen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for calling by Helen. I have also got some personal connections with Zimbabwe though I have never been there myself. Fingers crossed for that faraway land.

      Delete
  4. I had to look up that word - internecine. I cannot believe there will be a happy ending in Zimbabwe. We shall see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your inability to believe is probably well-founded Sue but on this happy day let's hope for the best.

      Delete
  5. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. You're very nice to have hope for positive change in Zimbabwe, but I've lived in Africa and I am certain that nothing much will change except the names of the swindlers on the Swiss bank accounts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's funny how African countries are often lumped together... it's all "Africa". The same generalisations are rarely made about Europe or indeed Asia. Even so I fear your cynicism is extremely valid Vivian.

      Delete
    2. Not true. One can certainly generalize that European countries enshrine "Western" ideals of democracy, equality, and governmental honesty as a generalization. One can also generalize that African governments do not. Name one African government that is not corrupt to its core.

      Delete
    3. Some African governments are better than others. Corruption, sadly, seems to afflict governments in most parts of the world. Europe and North America may be less afflicted -- though at the moment it's hard to tell whether that's true or not!

      Delete
    4. To Vivian - I wasn't particularly referring to governments or political matters, I just notice that Africa is often seen as an homogeneous chunk of the earth's surface. "I had a farm in Africa" etc.. When obviously there are so many cultures, so many languages, so many histories.

      Delete
  6. How I wish for those poor down-trodden people to have a happy and secure future. I just hope that my wishes are not in vain ..but.....

    ReplyDelete
  7. Nobody should be the ruler of a country for 37 years. Term limits have their uses! (I realize Elizabeth has been the UK's head of state for much longer, but thanks to the constitutional monarchy, she's not really the ruler in the absolute sense that Mugabe was.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elizabeth II is just a ceremonial head of state. Mugabe held the purse strings and like some sort of Roman emperor held sway over people's lives.

      Delete
  8. I hope that Mugabe is replaced by someone much better.

    ReplyDelete
  9. It seems that it may be a case of "out of the frying pan, into the fire," unfortunately, with Mnangagwa being a cruel man who would be much worse than Mugabe. I hope there can be a better solution.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just like Canada, Zimbabwe might be better off being governed once again from London!
      (Hee-hee-hee!)

      Delete

Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.