6 July 2018

Kirkmadrine

You don't have to be mad to work here but it helps.

After our evening meal on Thursday, Shirley just wished to lounge around reading after putting a few items of laundry in Slipway Cottage's washing machine. On the other hand, I still wanted to be out there in the evening sunshine.

On my Ordnance Survey map I had spotted the site of an abandoned church about a mile north of here. In Old English style lettering the site was marked as "Kirkmadrine - Remains of". Intriguing. And the site was a good distance from any lane or path with no houses nearby. Why would anyone build a church there? 

Perhaps there was a community there long ago. Perhaps there were tracks that led from surrounding farmsteads and crofts - long disappeared. Perhaps the rising ground on which Kirkmadrine was built was a place of pre-Christian significance. By the way, this Kirkmadrine should not be confused with any other Kirkmadrine in the region. It is not the only one.

Aerial imagery and Google Streetview helped me to plan my evening adventure. I  parked Clint in a gateway on the lane that leads to Innerwell. I had hoped to stroll across the adjacent field but it had been sown with wheat so I had to skirt round it. 

Then I had a barbed wire fence to negotiate before following a wide green track that nobody walks. Galloway cattle came sprinting up to the fence to see me led by my bovine stalker - Penelope who is standing in the middle of the group. 
Two hundred yards further on there was another fence to climb over. Ouch! And then I was into a recently mown wide meadow  that had been sprayed with manure. It was easy to walk across and there ahead was the site of Kirkmadrine Church.

I didn't know what I might find amidst those trees. There was no roof and the primitive building had largely tumbled down but there was a doorway with a stone lintel above and there were some gravestones too. One was the grave of a naval captain and there was a date upon it - 1876 - not so long ago.
Before heading back to Clint, I lingered a while in that ancient place and tried to imagine how it would have been long ago before the defunct parish of Kirkmadrine merged with the parish of Sorbie and became largely forgotten. Plodding back across the fields I felt rather elated to have spotted that remote site and to have actually been there and seen it with my own eyes. Bloody marvellous!

29 comments:

  1. You're an intrepid explorer Mr Pudding. Where next, the Amazon?

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    1. I have ordered a few books from Amazon.

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  2. And yet another beautiful day of wall to wall sunshine!
    Greetings Maria x

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  3. These are cattle living in Galloway. Galloway cattle are all black unless they are Belted Galloway Cattle.
    These are a Friesian or Friesian cross Charolais herd.
    Just thought you'd like to know.

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    1. PS. Tell Ian to watch out. Air New Zealand have vegan burgers on the menu. Not sure I'D want to eat a vegan but these colonials do have some odd dishes. Canada's national dish is chips and gravy.

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    2. Ha-ha! Well-spotted Adrian. I deliberately referred to the herd's home county - not their breed. I grew up next to a cow field where Friesians grazed. I will let Ian know about the Air NZ burgers. Thanks for that... and I hope you are well. Are you still in Fife?

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    3. Yes, I'm in charge for six weeks but haven't got a hat. Up to my arse in combine bits, belts, grease, old straw and rat shit. It's grand here.

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    4. No hat? Better improvise like a Yorkshireman at the seaside - a handkerchief with four corner knots. Very stylish.

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  4. A mystery solved! How fun!

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    1. But now there are other mysteries stemming from my visit...

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  5. Interesting walk and you were obviously pleased with your find. Congratulations.

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    1. I have found out more about my "find" now.

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  6. Loved the 'bloody marvellous' YP...so glad you enjoyed the whole experience.

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  7. Not many who would put in as much effort as you to get to the place and learn a few things about it.

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    1. I am slightly mad Red. That helps.

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  8. Penelope is honouring you as the father of a prominent vegan, she will bring more friends as your importance precedes you

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    1. But if we all become vegan there will be no need for cattle!

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  9. Well done, YP. That must have been quite a thrill.

    P. S. I'm glad there is no "smell" function on Blogger - I grew up in the country and have smelled quite enough manure being spread to last several lifetimes, thank you very much!

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    1. I wish I could buy a bottle of manure scented after shave for that authentic country aroma.

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  10. That is exactly the type of adventure I love - and I must admit I envy you a little for it. There won't be much time for any adventures this weekend, as the village band performs at two different village fĂȘtes and O.K. will be busy half of Saturday and Sunday.

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    1. What? Does OK play an instrument in the band? Perhaps he blows his own trumpet?

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  11. Congratulations, Mr. Pudding! I just watched England beat Sweden -- wish I was celebrating with all my favorite Brits.

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    1. Three lions on the shirt!
      Jules Rimet's still gleaming!
      It's coming home!
      Football's coming home!

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  12. Excellent! Good for you for being such an intrepid hiker. I use Google Streetview to plan my walks, too -- it's an invaluable tool! Were you on a public path to get to this church? I've never been on a path that's required me to scale a barbed-wire fence, but then I've mostly been walking in and around London where paths probably have a lot more traffic.

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    1. In Scotland walkers have a right to roam. Public rights of way are not marked on maps in the same way as they are in England.

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  13. Mr. P, I'm reading "The Lost City of Z". Regardless of your explorative tendencies, please avoid the Amazon and stay at home.

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    1. I see that that book was made into a film. I would like to see it. Could give me ideas...

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.