19 July 2013

Stanton

Yesterday, I managed to escape from the house. We are having some work done to our downstairs shower room and I have pretty much been trapped for a few days. I had arranged to take a friend to his sister's wedding at Hassop Hall near Bakewell and after dropping him off, I drove to Stanton in Peak between Bakewell and Darley Dale ready for a ten mile walk in the hot July sunshine.

Here's a small and rather typical terrace of stone houses in Stanton with delphiniums in the front garden:-
There are many ancient sites in Derbyshire and this stone circle is known as "The Nine Ladies". Perhaps not as physically impressive as Stonehenge but still a neolithic site that is heavy with mystery and meaning. It is up on Stanton Moor:-
This ancient site is known as "Nine Stone Close" but long ago, five of the tall standing stones must have been removed - perhaps by local farmers constructing walls before we began to venerate the works of our distant ancestors:-
I spotted this sign high on a wall in the hamlet of Alport. It must date back to the nineteenth century when I have no doubt that "vagabonds" roamed the English countryside, scrumping apples, sleeping in hedgerows, pestering country workers. It's not a word we seem to use much nowadays - vagabonds:-
After four hours I trudged back to the car. It had been a lovely summer's walk - tiring and hot but physically and psychologically fulfilling too. There was time for a little more. On my way back to Sheffield, I parked in the village of Edensor on the Chatsworth Estate. I had come to visit the graveyard of St Peter's church where Kathleen Kennedy's grave is located. She died in a tragic plane crash in France in 1948 and was the younger sister of John Fitzgerald Kennedy who visited this grave in the same year that he was to meet his own tragic end:-

7 comments:

  1. All interesting things and none of it did I know about. The photos as always are good.

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  2. Delphiniums are a lovely, old fashioned flower and we don't see enough of them these days.

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  3. Sir YP, why did they bury Kathleen Kennedy in St Peter's church she died in France? And what is the significance of the number nine at these ancient sites? I know I could Google, but it is much more fun asking :-/

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  4. DAVID OLIVER Thank you kind sir!
    JENNY At first I thought they were hollyhocks till somebody corrected me. An English (or Welsh) cottage garden in high summer is a wonderful sight to behold.
    CAROL IN CHAINS She was the widow of the Marquis of Hartington - heir to Chatsworth and the dukedom of Devonshire. He was killed in action during World War II but through marriage she was entitled to a special plot in the Cavendish section of St Peter's graveyard. By the way - when she died - she was with another English nobleman - Peter Fitzwilliam - heir to the Wentworth estate.
    About the nine stones - you're right - many stone circles contain nine stones - not ten or eight but nine. Although I know many things I don't know the answer to your question Carol. I'd like to know too. Please tell me if you find out.

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  5. No fair! I keep trying to grow Delphiniums, but they aren't happy in California. They grow one long stalk with a few wimpy flowers, then fall over with the first breeze. Your picture will make me keep trying, though, I love them.

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  6. You trying to lose weight or something? Walking ten miles in the heat is not good for a broth of a boy.

    LLX

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  7. LETTICE LEAF There you go again! My teacher! "broth of a boy" = an outstanding person; as if produced by boiling down a savoury broth.
    ....I shall buy you an apple - one day!

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