9 September 2013

Poem

11 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Jan - I guess the exclamation marks concern your own nestling?

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  2. Great to see you are still working on that Anthology Sir YP.

    Let us know when you are going to publish and we will all be ready with our 99cents on iBooks :)

    Hey, I just left a message for you on Google+ in case you don't get any alerts feeding through.

    Hoping all is fine and dandy :)

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    1. 99 cents? Is that all my angst and endless wordsmithing are worth?...But thanks for your encouragement Carol.

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  3. My heart is hurting for you Mr YP.

    Ride the thermals, float onwards, upwards. Your fledlings are free. Your job is done.

    This is your time... enjoy.

    LLX

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    1. Those kestrels know instinctively that their job in life is to raise young. Why should human beings be any different? At the core of things, that's what it is all about.

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  4. This summer we watched "up close and personal" as a Mom and Dad barn swallow raised not one but two broods of youngsters (5 in one, 4 in the other) right outside our window. All of the birds are just a memory now, but they brought us much joy while they were here.

    You may find this strange, but I still 'cry out my children's (and grandchildren's) names' in prayer every single day because the void of which you speak is far from empty.

    Excellent poem, by the way. Very evocative.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Robert - especially appreciated response from one who also values the endless quest of poetry to make sense of things and to share feelings and experience.

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  5. Yes, YP, that poem really struck home. I had ruined my keyboard, though and one of the few keys that still worked was the exclamation mark. I think pigeons make a better example for humans than raptors do. Raptor babies have to fly away and find new territory, pigeon babies become part of the larger family flock. Though they are self-sufficient, they still hang out with their parents and the birds they grew up with. I have fostered squabs and when I put them out, their parents still recognize them as adults and often let them share a roosting space. Buzzards do this, too. They have very tight family units.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.