25 October 2015

Siblings

Above, my children on the occasion of Frances's twenty seventh birthday just  before she left Birmingham for the bright lights of London. Ian was thirty one this August. They are the best of friends and as far as I can recall, it was always that way. Raising them was, on the whole, plain-sailing. They brought so much joy into our lives and though they have fled our humble Yorkshire nest and become "grown ups", they continue to enrich us. We have been very fortunate. They are happy, healthy, caring and imaginative people who relish life and still love coming back to Sheffield, their grumpy old man and their doting mummy.

One day I will be dead and yet this blog will very likely remain as a testament to my years on Earth. If in some distant time you are reading this blogpost  Frances...Ian... I just want to say thank you for being you, my beloved son and darling daughter, for making my life better and far more worthwhile than it would otherwise have been.  Not "love actually" but love always.

25 comments:

  1. What a beautiful expression of the sentiment Neil.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am pleased that this little post resonated with you Graham.

      Delete
  2. Beautiful blog post, and beautiful children! You're a lucky man. And how wonderful that those two are so close. I always wanted siblings, or to have close relationships with my husband's siblings, but neither was meant to be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The world must seem rather different when you are an only child. Perhaps a little more daunting.

      Delete
  3. Both are lovely-looking young people and, from all you've written about them, you have every reason to be proud of them; and they of you and Shirley as loving parents.

    I would hazard a guess and say your children are a reflection of you both, and results of the values you've instilled through the years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe that your hazardous guess has some substance Lee.

      Delete
  4. That is a beautiful post . Our children are our most precious loves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You see so much negative nonsense written about children - the minuses rather than the pluses.

      Delete
  5. Our three (2 boys and a girl, all born within a period of 40 months) have also always been close and are still the best of friends at 47, 49, and just turned 51. A roomful of laughter ensues whenever we are all together. I wish you many happy times with your lovely family. Whatever else we are, we both seem to have turned out to be successes as parents. My congratulations! Well done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Bob. Too often people forget to celebrate the joy of parenting and family.

      Delete
  6. Now that's a great tribute to your kids. I hope on some blog some day they write a tribute to their Dad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You might have to wait till hell freezes over for that Red!

      Delete
  7. Family is so importaint in this world. I was and am a daddy's girl, adored him, he died in 2004 from myeloma bone marrow cancer. I still talk to him, have his alarm clock, that I use. Little things I found a receipt he signed for petrol I framed it as was his signatures!.
    You are not going anywhere Yorkshire pudding, but one day in 40 years time will be nice for your children's!.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for dropping by Jacqueline. And say hello to your dad from me.

      Delete
  8. Where did that little girl in the bright pink sunglasses go?

    I can only echo all the comments already listed.

    Ms Soup

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes where did she go Alphie? Tempus fugit.

      Delete
  9. Another very touching post, Neil!
    It's great that your children always got along so well. My sister and I were terrible to each other sometimes when we were kids, but the older we get, the better we get along, and we have now been great friends for many years.
    When I was in my early teens, my parents bought a typewriter for my sister to practice typing on, she needed it for her job. It was a very new electronic model, and we couldn't suss it out properly at first. One afternoon, my Dad sat down with it and managed to get it working. He "test-typed" on a sheet of paper which I later found in the bin. He'd typed a brief summary of his life as it was back then, and I nearly cried when I read it, as it mentioned our Mum and my sister and myself in such a loving way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny how we remember little things like that - nailed in our memories for all time. It's a kind of psychological symbolism.

      Delete
  10. Smashing post YP.

    ReplyDelete
  11. A beautiful post Neil. Wonderful children are the result of parents who care passionately not only about those children, but also about each other and those around them and surround all with an attitude of care and respect. I've read your posts over many years and seen the grounded attitude you have towards such things as dining around a table and spending time as a family - such important things in today's world. Your love and care has reaped its reward in two fine young adults who will pass those values on to the next generation. Many congratulations to you and Shirley on doing such a super job - parents like you deserve a HUGE shout out. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you could see me now Elizabeth I am blushing like a red balloon! Thank you.

      Delete
  12. OK, I am blubbering ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hang on Carol, I will fetch a tissue!

      Delete

Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.