4 May 2016

Weekend

Lunchtime drinker in "The Old Red Cow", London
Observant blogfolk may have noticed that this infamous Yorkshire blog was quieter than usual over the past few days. That is because we visited a quaint country village in the south of England called London-on-Thames. You may have heard of it.

We were there to visit our beloved daughter, Princess Frances who for the past eighteen months has been "seeing" a fine young fellow called Stuart - who has a secret job in Hatton Gardens. They have known each other since they were four years old and who knows, perhaps they will remain together as we move into the unknown landscape of the future.
Princess Frances at The Barbican
We had a fairly expensive meal in "The Camberwell Arms" on Saturday night and a very cheap meal in "The Fox on the Hill" on Sunday night. In between we went out into Kent (The Garden of England) to visit Lullingstone Park in lovely spring sunshine. It is in the so-called "green belt" which is meant to inhibit London's ceaseless urban sprawl. And what a fine day out it was too, picnicking by The River Darent, walking through Beechen Wood and across rolling chalkland. Delightful - even though a few hundred yards further on and we would have been viewing London's orbital motorway.

On Monday, Lady Shirley was feeling ill with a nasty attack of Londonitis so being the thoughtful husband I am, Princess Frances and I left her to rest in the palatial apartment at Camberwell Green while we went to The Barbican Art Gallery to see a brilliant photographic exhibition called "Strangely Familiar". So many wonderful images - plenty from the middle of the last century and mostly in black and white. They recorded ordinary moments, ordinary people, ordinary scenes - making onlookers realise that the ordinary can be visually arresting if you only take the trouble to look.

Later that day, Lady Shirley felt well enough to be transported UpNorth by her trusty chauffeur. We waved farewell to Princess Frances and her lady in waiting Countess Kira who had just returned from a mini-holiday in Seville. Then silver Clint, our new horseless carriage, whisked us homewards to Yorkshire - land of my heart. It had been a most splendid weekend but you wouldn't want to stay too long in London. It would drive you mad after a while...or maybe just more mad.
WEEKEND GALLERY
CLICK to ENLARGE:-

26 comments:

  1. I'm glad your desertion of your loyal subjects with no prior warning had a right royal reason, Lord Yorkie.

    Not that you have every to give us lowly souls forewarning, this we understand.

    We, your the most faithful of servants; your devoted subjects, including my humble self; we who remain steadfast in allegiance I guarantee, my Liege - we of the lower echelon have been standing by worried three-quarters to death chewing our fingernails down to our knuckles wondering what foul deed we'd done to cause such harsh treatment.

    We are most happy you had a pleasant weekend, even if Lady Shirley felt poorly. Surely, as days are not nights, she welcomed the respite from the Londonites.

    'Tis most heartening, also, to learn that your trusty silver steed, Clint transported you safely home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thou hast spoken and thou hast spoken well milady. May I shower you with heartfelt apologies for the damage I unwittingly caused to your tender marsupial digits.

      Delete
  2. The prof are london bound in a week or so......3 days of nice city times

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you are taking your bestial entourage too. Winnie is sure to attract crowds of oriental tourists.

      Delete
  3. My favorite photo is the one with the cloud. I love it!

    Your daughter is lovely, too, I should add. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I dedicate that cloud photo to you. Henceforth it shall be known as The Jennifer Photo. Thank you.

      Delete
  4. This prairie boy would be standing in one place just looking at the area. There would be much to see.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Prairie boy" - that's a nice term Red. One day in the far distant future, perhaps those words can be carved on your headstone...
      Here lie the mortal remains of
      Red
      Son, Husband, Father, Teacher and Prairie Boy

      Delete
    2. Born and raised on the prairie is branded on you forever. You have no idea what flat is!!!

      Delete
  5. Holy cow, YP, you got some great shots on this trip. I love the one up top of the man in the window, and the one of the guy carrying the blanket (duvet, I suppose) across the street. Glad you enjoyed a day out in our tiny village on the Thames. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am always honoured to receive any kind of praise from such a fine and observant photographer as yourself Steve. Have you been to the "Strangely Familiar" exhibition in The Barbican?

      Delete
    2. I haven't been yet, but it's on my list!

      Delete
  6. I had noticed your absence and echo your views of London. I must go again but perhaps not yet. I was last there when our elder son died there in 2006. Princess Frances has a lovely warm smile (is one allowed to say that these PC days?).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hate to break it to you Graham but I think you are too "mature" for Princess Frances and besides, though not wishing to cause offence, I would not want you as a son in law! You're not rich enough.

      Delete
    2. Ah yes: an academic socialist.

      Delete
  7. Forsooth YP, 'tis many a league you've travelled to the side of the fair Princess Frances. We've heard told that the little village is growing into a town at a wondrous pace, with many sights to behold. 'Tis many years since we were last near London on Thames - in the nearby hamlet of Heathrow, to be exact.
    We trust your silver steed served you well, needing just a swift rub down upon your safe return ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Twas the rider that required the rubbing down - not the trusty steed Mistress Seegee.

      Delete
  8. Good to know you are safely back home in Pudding Towers, and I hope Lady Shirley is as right as rain again.
    I've not been to London since my sister's 40th birthday in 2007, but there used to be a time in my life when I knew it pretty well.
    The three elderly ladies in what looks like carefully coordinated outfits look as if they are on their way to church (or worship). I can just imagine them having known each other a lifetime, still sharing joys and sorrows.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your detective skills are sharp Miss Arian. The ladies were going to St John the Divine on Vassall Road, Kennington and they asked me to snap their picture. I emailed the photo to the taller lady whose name is Meg. I love to get pictures of strangers but it is quite difficult to do so.

      Delete
  9. That looks like a great place to visit, and what wonderful photos too. Warm greetings!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Get on a train to Eynsford in Kent. Lullingstone Park and the Roman Villa are a shortish walk from the station. Eynsford is on the line to Sevenoaks. It has three or four pubs, a river and a Norman Castle. You could have a lovely day out there Blogoratti.

      Delete
  10. I've finished the painting of your heron image...how do I send a photo?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jan! That's brilliant! Temporarily I am going to put my email address here:=
      neiltheasby@hotmail.com

      Delete
  11. Sounds like a great trip except for poor Shirley feeling unwell. Hope she is better now. Its always nice to catch up with the grown up kids.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sydney is slightly further from Brisbane than London is from Sheffield!

      Delete
  12. Sounds like a wonderful trip. That picture at the top reminded me of something. I saw an older lady or a long-haired man sitting in their front yard around the corner with a bottle of beer at 9:00am the other morning. I was shocked. Hope the Princess has found her Prince.

    ReplyDelete

Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.