3 November 2018

Circuit

At Hope Cross
My silver companion, Mr Clint, was parked at the junction of Fullwood Stile Lane and Edale Road, north of the village of Hope.

"How long are you going to be this time?" said Clint with an undertone of irritation in his voice.

"About three hours. Maybe four," I replied as I pulled my boots out of Clint's rear end.

"I suppose I should be happy you've parked me here," he said.

"What do you mean?"

"Well I can see some sexy European babes as they come across that bridge over there. Did you see that Fiat 500 that just passed by? The coffee coloured one?" drooled Clint. "She winked her left headlight at me."

"You dirty dog!" I exclaimed, reprimanding my lusty South Korean friend as I pressed the "Lock" button on my Hyundai keyfob and set off on another circular walk.
The Roam road to Hope Cross
Up the narrow lane to Fullwood Stile Farm - crossing the railway track that traverses The Vale of Edale. Then I met the old Roman road that heads up the valley side to Hope Cross. 
It was a long steady climb. The swathes of bracken - so vigorous and green in summertime  - had all turned golden brown like ripe tobacco. Occasional ragged sheep observed me plodding by. I was walking quite literally in the footsteps of Roman soldiers who had regularly tramped that little track almost two thousand years before.
Edale - illuminated like dream scenery
How beautiful daylight can be in early November. I marvelled at my favourite valley down below - lovely Edale - illuminated like dream scenery - and beyond were the brooding moors that separate the east of northern England from the west. A toy train moved like an arrow on its way from Sheffield to Manchester.
Slack Barn in The Vale of Edale
Hope Cross marks an ancient moorland crossroad. Here drovers, jaggers, thieves and farmers rested a while in days gone by. I opened the nearby galvanized gate to allow two mountain bikers through before descending to Jaggers Clough. Then up again and then down the long diagonal track that leads to Clough Farm. Here I turned west by the little River Noe and enjoyed its wordless company all the way back to Mr Clint. 

"Wake up! Wake up!" I called  for he was sleeping - zeds emerging from under his silver bonnet - or what Americans call a "hood". Funny that. I thought a "hood" was where dangerous fellows wearing gold chains and baseball caps hung about dealing drugs and suchlike while voicing indecipherable rapping lyrics. Yo!

"Errr...you're back! What time is it?"

"Three thirty. Let's go home."

This was just yesterday.
At Edale End Farm two hundred sheep were blocking the public footpath

28 comments:

  1. I would love to have your easy way with words.

    I have just caught up with the posts I missed whilst otherwise occupied. I assume that you are good at crosswords. Why? When I read the Reservoir poem it made me realise how often we become used in our own mind with matching a meaning to a word when there are often so many meanings.

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    1. I am only good at straight crosswords Graham but when it comes to cryptic puzzles I would not cross swords with you my friend.

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    2. I love straight crosswords as you call them but am totally useless at cryptic ones. My mind does not work that way.

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  2. You certainly have some wonderful places to walk.. the photographs are delightful of those beautiful vistas

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    1. Good light can gild even the drabbest lily Elle.

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  3. That dreamlike view of Edale is heart-tuggingly beautiful! I spent a weekend on the slopes of the Hope Valley in 2010 with my sister and two pairs of aunts (twins) and uncles (their husbands) and have fond memories of the area.

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    1. The Vale of Edale is magical in my humble opinion and I have see many wonderful places in my life.

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  4. Can we see Clint please, he sounds like my type.
    Briony
    x

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    1. You have got your Tom, you don't need a Clint too you saucy mare!

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    2. Enough of the Mare, filly if you don't mind.

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    3. Filly? I thought that was cream cheese.

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  5. What a beautiful, beautiful walk!
    I wonder if the roads and paths I take were originally deer tracks, perhaps Indian trails. I'll never know. They left no sign of themselves if so.

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    1. Native American tribes loved and respected the lands they inhabited. We could learn a lot from their example couldn't we Ms Moon? They didn't need plastic bags to carry things - they wove baskets instead.

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  6. Gregg always says (when I show him pictures you post) that your area reminds him of places in Virginia. Not me--to me, it looks like quintessential English countryside. Beautiful.

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    1. I am glad you liked this post Jennifer. One day I must take a photo of a Greggs bake shop. I was in one last week and bought a steak mince slice. BTW - Shirley was in Barlow yesterday!

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  7. I love it when you take us to Hope. The photo of the Edale valley is so awesome! Thanks for the walk. Beautiful day.

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    1. Hope is a splendid name for a place. There used to be a little antique and junk store there called "Living in Hope"... but ironically the business failed!

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  8. I always like your walks where you describe the area, give a little history and then imagine what might have happened there. Keep on walkin and watch out for those hoods. Now we've got hoodies so you have more to worry about.

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  9. Oh I enjoyed that walk! There's nothing like a beautiful Fall day. Walking in the footsteps of Roman soldiers of so long ago is amazing. I wonder who will walk in our footsteps in the future and what they will think of us?

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    1. The way we are going - ruining our beautiful planet - I think that what will follow us is fungi emerging from the watery devastation we have left behind.

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  10. You sure do like and enjoy walking, Yorkie. And we enjoy your photos taken during those rambles. :)

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    1. Thanks for accompanying me on my walk Lee. Sorry about the blisters on your feet!

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  11. What super photos photos of a lovely part of the world. Edale with the sheep in the foreground is particularly nice, I think. I have walked a little in this part of Derbyshire, and once went on a map-reading course here. I wasn't very good!

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    1. I... HOPE you didn't get lost Jacqui!

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  12. How did you get around those sheep? I love the one hiding behind the stone. It obviously thinks you can't see it.

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    1. I had to get by them Steve. It was kind of weird. I stood against the fence then one bolted in the other direction and without speaking all the rest followed in a kind of stampede. I guess I am a scary fellow.

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