7 November 2018

Leaf

This is a beech leaf that I picked from an overhanging branch in The Derwent Valley just yesterday. I was walking with my lady to the ruins of Derwent village which normally sits below the surface of Ladybower Reservoir. She hadn't been there before.

There were many leaves like that one - mostly scattered beneath the trees that bore them. Every autumn leaf is slightly different from the next one and I don't know about you but to me each leaf is rather like a mini work of art - kindly created for us  by Mother Nature.

17 comments:

  1. So funny - I misread Leafbower to leafblower!

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    1. Cough-cough! LADYBOWER! not Leafbower you Silly Girl!

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    2. Your comment made me laugh laugh laugh!!!

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  2. Absolutely. I find that I pay a lot of attention to leaves at this time of year, when their individuality becomes most apparent!

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  3. Indeed, and autumn colours are amazing. Rich and radiating warmth. On my daily travails I often pick up a few leaves which their host trees have discarded, take them home and make "flaming red" arrangements in vases around the house.

    U

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    1. We don't need flowers to make nice displays do we?

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  4. Beautiful! I love the joy the leaves give us this time of the year. So simple yet so complicated at the same time.

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  5. So true! It's tempting sometimes to take them all home :)

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    1. I think you would need a much bigger house to successfully do that Jenny!

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  6. I had an art project once that involved fall leaves. I collected a few from my dogwood tree to use as models and was struck by the fact that the colors were naturally much wilder and more random than my imagination would have made them. Same thing happens when I need to paint a sky, I'm more conservative than nature.

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    1. Well hello stranger! Thanks for calling by again today. Maybe you could show us some of your pictures in your moth-balled blog!

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  7. Interesting comment from an art point of view. What would you say if your back ground was from science?

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    1. I guess I might say something about how chlorophyll breaks down and how in autumntime, because of changes in the length of daylight and changes in temperature, the leaves stop their food-making process. The chlorophyll breaks down, the green colour disappears, and the yellow to orange colours become visible and give the leaves part of their autumn splendour.

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  8. Like Ursula, I used to pick up the most beautiful leaves I found on the ground and displayed them at home. But nowadays I am either on my way to work (where I can not "do" anything with the leaves) or home, when it is already dark.

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