7 February 2019

Mercredi

In the village of Coussa's cemetery, I spotted a small Jesus scaling a gravestone. He was dissociated from the iron cross to which he must have once been affixed and looked none too happy about the separation.

Some of the family graves had extra plaques on them. I spotted this one and was surprised that I could translate it immediately. I liked its sentimentality:-
The leaves fall,
the seasons pass by,
only the memory
endures.
The day had stayed overcast but dry and a little warmer than when I first arrived here. Rather than driving to Mirepoix, I donned my boots and set off from the house along a very quiet country lane. 

First of all, it led to a farm called La Monge D'En Bas. I was wary as I approached because of barking dogs. They were running loose and one of them - a healthy black labrador - decided that he would accompany me. He walked with me for about two miles - far from his home - bef'ore running off into some woods. I didn't see him again but I had already caught him on camera. I called him Macron. Here he is:-
I had an excellent, detailed map in my pocket but some of the tracks and paths indicated did not appeat to exist so I stuck to the paved lanes and travelled in a big circle.

It's a mile from Coussa to Robin and Susi's former farmhouse and when I got back to the property it wasn't long before clouds surrendered to sunshine and blue sky. That's sod's law I guess. Here's their place with Pierre Le Citroen snoozing in front:- 

22 comments:

  1. Macron is handsome! And obviously a nice dog, since he kept you company for a while on your walk! I think I've heard before that the French rarely keep their dogs contained.

    Jesus scaling the gravestone made me laugh.

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    1. As a regular countryside walker I am always wary of dogs. Laughing at Jesus means you'll be turned away at The Pearly Gates - that's for sure!

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  2. Awww...labs are so sweet and goofy, even the French ones. I wold love to have a rent-a-lab to take on walks.

    I'm catching up on your French sojourn and the countryside looks inspiring. I'm sure your walks are quite a change from Yorkshire.

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    1. English maps are so much better in the sense that public rights of way are clearly marked. It's a bit harder to roam in France. Thanks for calling by once again Madame Vivian.

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  3. And I had just google translated that phrase which you left in a comment on my blog this morning! A very appropriate quote for what I've been feeling. Poor Jesus. He just can't win. On the cross or off, he's going to suffer. Better to be a friendly dog, happy to walk with a nice stranger for a bit.

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    1. Better to be a dog than Jesus? Good grief Madame, do not pass this thought on to any God-fearing born again neighbours!

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  4. Dogs know instinctively who they can befriend or not. I know what I am saying is correct, from observing how our Toby behaves when he meets new people.
    So it is obvious that Macron new you on sight.

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    1. I am not used to dogs Mr Heron. More of a cat man myself so thnks for your considered reflection.

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  5. I'm sure Macron enjoyed his walk with you. Lucky dog to be able to run free.

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  6. Sounds like a pleasant day. The roof strikes me as being in remarkably good condition. I've spent a few days 'walking the roof' in France and appreciate a good roof when I see one.

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    1. Robin re-tiled that roof himself to keep the place totally waterproof.

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  7. You had a nice walk with a companion today. I'm a bit wary around unknown dogs as well. That's a large farmhouse - you might lose a few cats in that house!

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    1. Only the right half is Robin and Susi's home. The left half contains three holiday rentals.

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  8. That is quite a large dog. I would have been wary at first, too. One never knows. Cats run away from a person, dogs run toward a person, and I wish they wouldn't!

    That is a pretty home - so different in style from what we are used to here.

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    1. Inside the house there are huge oak beams. It was probably constructed in the seventeeth century.

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  9. I'm glad you had a good walk; after all, that is part of what you came for, right?
    I wonder what made you translate "...est étérnel" into "endures" instead of "is eternal". Did you like the sound of it better?

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    1. PS: I think Jesus wouldn't mind. He must have a great sense of humour.

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    2. Yes. I like the sense of "enduring" - it gives more suggestion of time passing by rather than "eternal" which seems so stark and final.

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  10. Every day is Easter Sunday in Coussa, it would appear!

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  11. What a great house! Lots of character! The dog looks very...enthusiastic.

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  12. That is a huge house.

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