2 November 2015

HDR

In photography, HDR stands for High Dynamic Range. It is a technique used in imaging and photography to reproduce a greater dynamic range of luminosity than is possible with standard digital imaging or photographic techniques. The aim is to present the human eye with a similar range of luminance as that which, through the visual system, is familiar in everyday life. The previous sentence was lifted directly from Wikipedia because I don't really understand what HDR is. All I know is that when you use it you can create some rather eye-catching pictures that appear to re-interpret reality.

Above you can see a photograph that I took near Stanage Edge last Thursday. What I saw that afternoon is what you get in that picture - untouched and unaltered - just the gate, the rough pasture and beyond that part of the rugged escarpment that is Stanage Edge.

Back home, I put that same picture into Lenovo "Photomaster" on this laptop. Then I looked at a range of possible "effects" and selected the following two HDR preferences to show you how a relatively ordinary photograph can suddenly become rather eye-catching and other worldly. Of course you wouldn't want to apply this visual chicanery every time you present a picture to other people for very often what we want to see is untainted reality - the truth and too much messing about with pictures can prove quite tiresome.

What do you think?

24 comments:

  1. I think you need to get Photomatix. It's free to trial it.

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    1. PS. This sort of thing is to be encouraged, I just don't think the software used did you clicking justice.

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    2. A couple of commenters have asked me about HDR in the past and this blogpost was simply to illustrate the kind of things that it can do. I wasn't presenting the pictures as models of achievement.

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    3. I wasn't criticising you. I was suggesting you try the best software for the job. I'll have a look at Lenova and see what it is but it looks a bit like some of the Topaz algorithms.

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    4. This may be of interest.

      HDR PHOTOGRAPHER

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  2. I'll stick to basic comments because that's what I do best.
    In the untouched photo, the fence and foreground stand out; in the second photo it is a dramatic landscape. I am not that keen on the black and white - and I agree with you about using 'artistic licence' to alter every photo; I prefer to see the best of the originals, not something that has been tricked out on every occasion.

    Thanks for this example of what can be down with photo workshops.

    Ms Soup

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    1. Imagine me doffing my cap to you Alphie. Thanks for calling by.

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  3. You have a new follower called Ricky Jerk who has left a comment on your blog post about Time (two before this one) ... I am having a good laugh because he is trying to sell you waygu beef (Mr Beefgravy) LOL

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    1. Thank you Carol. I have now deleted Beef Jerky's comment!

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  4. I prefer to look at original photos. But that's just me.

    I love that you found Rapunzel's tower and put it up as your new masthead. What is that, exactly, and where?

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    1. The stone tower is between Silsden and Addingham in West Yorkshire. It was erected in the mid-nineteenth century for surveyors who were involved in the construction of a major viaduct in the nearby valley.

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    2. Oh and I forgot to brag that I took that picture myself.

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  5. I can see an application for this sort of thing. If you're a watercolor painter and need to find ways to put more "life" into your paintings, this application could give you clues how to do that.

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    1. In fact there's an HDR effect that is subtitled "HDR Painting". Yes, I see what you mean about "clues" Jan.

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  6. The second picture has something eerie about it. The black-and-white one is less eerie and more "artsy". But the original photo is still the best in my eyes.

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    1. On this occasion I think so too but there can be other times when HDR is the right choice.

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  7. A little HDR goes a long way, in my book! (Although I kind of like the black & white one.)

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    1. I used to think that HDR was a pill - often taken by menopausal women.

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  8. I prefer the first photo, to be honest....because it's honest, I guess.

    Along with you, I seem to be surrounded by those who are talented photographers. My ex is one and I have three friends who also are brilliant lens' men. One has just returned home (last Friday) from a few weeks spent in the States...in California, Arizona and surrounding areas. Once he's sorted out all his shots I'm looking forward to seeing them. I keep urging him to have a showing of his work. I think he will do so sometime next year.




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    1. How about you Lee? You often include some great photos with your posts. Were they mainly taken by you?

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    2. Very few are mine, Yorkie! I'm a hopeless photographer...I'm just a point and shoot girl...and hope for the best! lol

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    3. I bet you used the same philosophy when seeking boyfriends in Gympie!

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  9. So many people manipulate their digital photos these days. Adjusting the amount of light and straightening photos I understand but the tendency to use Photoshop and other programs to add colour and remove wrinkles/ heck even make people thin, leaves me cold. The best photographs don't need any fiddling.

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    1. What an ridiculous statement. It's just quicker now than it was in the days of film and prints. All that dodging, burning and masking not to mention a bag full of filters for the camera.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.