20 January 2014

Inversion

In wintertime there are always a few days when clouds become trapped in The Hope Valley because of a phenomenon known as "temperature inversion". Perhaps I should have driven out of the city a couple of hours earlier in order to capture the entire visual magnificence of today's temperature inversion but never mind - at least I was there, for once with my trusty camera. As I strolled in the sunshine that beamed down upon Stanage Ede, in front of me the cloughs and wooded valleys were dramatically wreathed in white cloud. It was wondrous to behold. Here are just four of the images I snapped:-
Sometimes we should count our blessings that we have the gift of sight. Click on these pictures to make them bigger.

23 comments:

  1. Just beautiful Sir Apostrophe of Sheffield. Just what I imagined. I see your census of wayward apostrophes in your fair county is going well ~ I spot another flock in the foreground of image 3.

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    1. Carol - Some people don't realise that there are white apostrophes as well as the more common black ones. Those particular white apostrophes were fat Derbyshire ones - often bigger than the printed words in which they are mechanically inserted.

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  2. Beautiful, touching photographs, Mr. Pudding. I await one of your beautiful poems to touch our heart as these photos touched our eyes.

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    1. MT You know how it is when a fish rises up from the inky bottom of a lake? That's how poems are with me. Before too long one will come up I'm sure. Thank you for your kind encouragement.

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  3. Especially the second picture has a magic quality to it, but all four are very, very beautiful.
    Ah, so you do believe in the mythical white apostrophe! Couldn't it be a flock of common commas which are so often, at a distance, mistaken for apostrophes?

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    1. I do so enjoy your humour Meike.

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    2. Meike - In England commas are farmed intensively in sheds. It is almost impossible to track down free range commas these days. In contrast, question marks run wild in the uplands of Scotland and The Lake District. As for the poor semi colon - it is almost extinct! How are things in Deutschland?

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  4. Truly beautiful YP..well done. I have always wanted to see the Aurora Borealis and as I looked at these pics it made me think of them...beautiful images of nature in her finest.

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    1. Libby - To see your aurora borealis you will need two strategically placed mirrors!....Pleased you liked my pics. When I brought them home I was like a kid on Christmas morning. I unwrapped them and there they were.

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  5. These pictures have an ethereal quality which one cannot help but appreciate. I think it's over 40 years since I experienced that in Borrowdale where I climbed into the sun and beheld an autumnal world of mist below me. I shall never forget it.

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    1. I am pleased that my pics rang a bell in your memory sir. It's ten o'clock in the morning and the light looks promising. I think I will take another drive up to to Stanage and read my book like a sad old git, waiting for the sun to shine and more beauty to be revealed.

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  6. Surreal pictures. Well done.

    Thank you. Love love, Andrew. Bye.

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    1. Glad you appreciated them Andrew!!

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  7. You have cracked it with these. I used to find Curbar Gap another excellent place for inversions. The Lakes have great ones too but it means walking in the dark, uphill, for miles to capture them.

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    1. Whenever I have spotted the temperature inversion phenomenon in the Hope Valley before, I haven't had a camera with ,me. I am just so happy I nailed it yesterday. You know how it is Adrian - sometimes you just know you've captured something special in your camera and you can't wait to see it.

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  8. Wonderful. I love them all, but is that FROST on the ground in the third one? It's sweltering here. It looked strangelyalien to me.
    I have to go back and catch up on the apostrophe thing I see.

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    1. Yes that is frost Kate. It hid in the shadows cast by drystone walls and stayed all day.

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  9. I notice you carefully avoided photographing the line of huge 60-foot fans in place to blow the clouds back to Lancashire where they belong. What would Manchester be today without everyday rain ...
    And here's a couple of Mediterranean Apostrophes for your collection' ' '.

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  10. Do I detect a soupcon of Lancophobia in your response Brian? Those fans are in urgent need of replacement... like Barnsley fans!

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  11. You can guarantee that if ever I see anything as beautiful as that, my camera and I are miles apart!

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    1. Hippo - I have seen the phenomenon several times in the past - but never with a camera at hand.

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  12. Great photos, particularly the first one that looks more like an artist's work of the imagination than your actual real life!

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    1. Yes I felt the same about that particular photo Ian. It's now my new desktop background.

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