6 February 2014

Contrast

Porthleven is in Cornwall, right by the Atlantic Ocean. Above you can see the village's  Bickford-Smith Institute (1882) with its sturdy clock tower. Though it looks like a church, it isn't and never has been. It was a most ambitious location for such a building - given the wild Atlantic storms that will occasionally sweep in to smash upon the foreshore. The amazing picture below is from today's "Guardian":-
The south west of England and indeed south Wales have had a terrible battering from the weather this winter. So far they have had virtually no snow or frost but record rainfall and storms have repeatedly hit that part of the country causing widespread flooding, destruction and misery. Yesterday, the only railway track into Cornwall was breached at Dawlish in Devon and a large section of the sea wall that carries it was washed away. It will surely take many weeks to repair.

Meanwhile here in Yorkshire, you'll be pleased to know we are still enjoying exceptionally mild winter weather - even if there has been rather more rain than we would have liked in recent days. Time for another mug of tea methinks...

13 comments:

  1. At least the Grauniad got the caption right. The Telegraph had it down as a church. Mind you I only get the Telegraph cos it covers half my home and has a much harder crossword.
    I must get tea on drektly.

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    1. "covers half my home"...? What? You mean you use the Telegraph as wallpaper?

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  2. Wow, like taking your building through a carwash.

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    1. It seems that the Bickford-Smith Institute has been hit by big waves many times before. They must have built it very strong indeed.

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  3. Boy, I am getting pretty good at this. Zoomed right in on it at Harbor and Cliff Roads. For all those naysayers out there.....repete after me.....climate change is not real...climate change is not real...climate change is not real...!

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    1. You save a lot of money by travelling courtesy of Google and you don't have to meet any nasty foreigners either.

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  4. The railway track breach at Dawlish was even featured in the main evening news on German national telly, and they surely do not mention every storm or flooding around. I hope people will be able to rebuild their homes etc., but I must admit I always am very troubled by the thought of drowning animals, for instance if they are in a stable and can not get out.

    On a lighter note: I have spontaneously taken tomorrow off, hoping it will be as beautiful as today - 9 Celsius and sunny blue skies - so that I can go for a nice, long walk!

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    1. Well I hope the weather remains suitable for walking. Don't get lost Arian!

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  5. Blimey!

    The swamped railway line made the Angolan news too.

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    1. Blimey! - A similar exclamation came to mind when I saw that picture - Crikey! Now hide the cream buns Bunter - Mr Quelch is coming!

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  6. I think the storms on the south coast must have made the news everywhere. They've featured large in New Zealand too. Playing the Glad Game that will make the BBC some much-needed money in royalties.

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  7. My son learnt to surf there, I don't think he would fancy those waves though.

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  8. For once it is not our weather misfortunes in the news. Fantastic photo but scarey to live through. Hope it stops raining in the south soon. Those poor people in Somerset who have been flooded for so long have my deepest sympathy. At least when it floods here it isn't cold !

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.