17 January 2015

Countryside

Yesterday, on my little excursion to Creswell Crags, I also stopped to take  pictures of some of the countryside east of Sheffield. Here are two I have chosen to share with you:-
Above, looking east from High Moor Lane towards Whitwell. In the foreground an ancient  boundary wall makes an accidentally beautiful limestone mosaic. Below, near Loscar Farm and Bondhay Barn, two windmills from different ages glance sideways at each other beneath a wintry sky, illuminated by late afternoon sunshine-

10 comments:

  1. I love the stone wall, of course. I imagine James Herriot on his way to a lambing, strolling the field with his veterinary bag in hand and faithful hound frolicking alongside.
    We've got some of those new windmills nearby, too. Last time I was at the coast near Tokeland, I noticed there are several across the hillside. They seem terribly alien and out of place in the landscape to me.

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    1. I agree Hilly. We have too many of those wind turbines in England now. At first I thought they were elegant but now they seem like blots on the landscape.

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  2. Stunning contrast in the second photo YP. The romance of windmills. Another winner for you I suggest.

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  3. Wind harnessed for old methods and new. Wind turbines are far kinder to the environment than coal fired smoke stacks. There, now I've thrown that rock into the pool I'll quickly duck down beneath the nearest stone wall....

    Ms Soup

    Ms Soup

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    1. In assessing wind turbines these matters should be factored in - the energy involved in the manufacture of one, the mining and processing of the natural resources required to make it, fuel and transport costs in the erection of one, ongoing maintenance costs and of course the actual energy it produces and how that energy is transmitted to the national grid. Some estimates suggest that true energy "pay back" only kicks in after twenty years.

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  4. Great shot of a blot on the landscape.

    Was it actually doing anything? I bet it was taking power for it's de-icing system.

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    1. Ancient people from Creswell Crags might have worshipped it if they had come across it but no - it wasn't moving.

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  5. The first one with is "wavy" pattern reminds me a bit of one I took some years ago. It is the first one on this post. Of course the landscape is very different and my pictures are never as thoughtfully composed as yours, but you get the idea.
    The second one is very interesting. I'd not seen any of the old windmills when I was in your area before. Unlike most other people, I don't mind the new ones. They don't make noise, they don't smell bad, and they don't cover much precious ground.

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    1. I checked out that post. The first picture is a nice one and I see what you mean about "waviness". Regarding wind turbines, I think you might need a hearing test Miss Arian because when you are near to them in a stiff wind the whooshing sound is unnatural and disconcerting. British people who live very close to them have often complained.

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  6. That second photos is such a wonderful depiction of the old and the new. I like it!

    That doesn't mean that I don't also like the first shot as well!

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