6 March 2015

Redmires

All that is left of  "The Grouse and Trout Inn" that served thirsty customers
up at Redmires from 1852 to 1913. Curiously the date on the carved stone
is 1828 so the lost building may have served an earlier purpose.
To the west of Sheffield, there are three reservoirs which were constructed in the middle of the nineteenth century to supply the city with clean water. A cholera epidemic in 1832  had killed four hundred and two citizens. so the need for improved water provision was most pressing.

Redmires is five and a half miles from the city centre. The effort and the funding for the reservoir project must have been enormous with Irish navvies being drafted in to do much of the heavy work. They created three stepped reservoirs, imaginatively labelling them - upper, middle and lower.

I was up there earlier today, mostly to sit in  the car and concentrate on the novel I am currently reading but I also had a little stroll and snapped a few pictures which Inow share with you for free!

11 comments:

  1. The brick window is my favorite picture - I love the sunshine on the wall to the left! Old bricks have such character.
    The hole (well?) in the second picture is spooky. I wonder if the dog jumped in the fourth picture and am happy to see that you remembered to shut the gate as you left in the last picture. The mosses are lovely in the first pic, too. Your weather looks to be as nice as ours has been - unusual for us this time of year.

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    1. The hole is called a bellmouth and if you fell in there you would be swept down to the middle reservoir like a rag doll. I am surprised that it is not fenced off more securely. By the way the window picture was from that little building in the bellmouth picture.

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  2. What is the purpose of the hole in the water in the second picture? I find this most intriguing!
    When you said "I was up there earlier today, mostly to sit in the car and concentrate on the novel I am currently..." I was getting excited, thinking the next word would be "writing", but then it turned out to be "reading" (which maybe was exciting for you, but not for others).
    The last picture has it all: stone wall, gate, trees, water... Perfect!

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    1. I am writing a novel called "The Yorkshire Ambassador". It is set in Germany and is rather like "Fifty Shades of Gray". The hole in the picture is called a bellmouth - it drains overflow water from the upper reservoir.

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  3. I love the window shot, too...brilliant! I'm glad you put your book down for a while, Yorky. :)

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    1. It is very peaceful up there. It's a dead end road and then the moors.

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  4. The window shot, my favorite, looks like a painting by Andrew Wyeth.

    I wonder whether Kate will think so too.

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    1. Thank you Bob. You are an astute judge.

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  5. Yet again I am reminded that instead of trundling past I ought to stop and stare.

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    1. It pleases me that some of my photos intrigue you Adrian - and invite you to think about fairly familiar places anew.

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  6. I think Adrian and I should move in next door to you and Shirley, Mr. Pudding. (Not together, of course!) We could tramp about with you, me packing a three course lunch and Adrian toting your photographic gear. You can show us the world and tell us the history of it as well.

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