2 March 2015

Revisiting

Overstones Farm beneath Stanage Edge. It has appeared in this blog before. The place is so photogenic and whenever I pass by, if  my camera is in the car, I might stop to snap a few pictures if the lighting is good. Over the years, I must have taken a hundred shots of Overstones from different positions, at different times of day and in different seasons. For example, see this post from 2012.

Anyway, here are today's offerings:-
Half a mile further down the road to Hathersage I stopped to take a picture of another farm. This one, at Callow, is in ruins and behind it on the horizon looms a rocky outcrop called Higger Tor. In times gone by this was a primitive fortress, like nearby Carl Wark - long before the Romans came...

11 comments:

  1. Have you ever actually been visiting at Overstones Farm? I remember it from at least one previous post, but it is, as you say, so photogenic it looks great no matter how often one looks at it. And with the sky and the seasons forever changing, it never looks the same twice.
    As for the runied farm and the fortress above - now, that would be places irresistible for me! Can you get there, or is there no (legal) access?

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    1. Yes there is legal access just past Callow Farm and I have been amongst those ruins, soaking up the stories of long ago. If I won the National Lottery I think I would buy Overstones Farm but no I have never been inside this private property.

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  2. What a fabulous looking area. Thanks for sharing. :)

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  3. As a child I loved the remote countryside. I can remember going across the Denbigh Moors when I was very small and thinking how vast they were. Now I live somewhere far more remote and yet it's not, in reality, because I can be almost anywhere on the Island (the largest of the British islands after the British 'Mainland' and Ireland) in less than a couple of hours. The really remote places are, in many ways, the farms you are showing: not because of their physical distance from large places but because of the way of life that they represent(ed).

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    1. I never knew that your island was the third biggest Graham. It is both Lewis and Harris but does it have another name? Does it have just one name in Gaelic?

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    2. It is one physical entity usually referred to as Lewis and Harris (or in Gaelic Leòdhas agus Na Hearadh). The two names are principally a reflections of historic and administrative division.

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  4. Your English names for places sound strange to my American ears - Higger Tor and Carl Wark make me grin ;-)
    How is it you know the names of each place that you photograph? The two bright green doors on buildings at Overstones Farm catch my eye and are the little white blobs sheep?

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    1. Yes they are sheep Hilly. Regarding names, Britain's Ordnance Survey mapping is very precise and helpful. Many names like Carl Wark and Higge Tor have come to us through the mists of ancient history, sometimes changing slightly along the way.

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  5. Beautiful scenery but its ruggedness always calls to mind freezing horizontal rain and the misery only Army instructors can inflict!

    Your man Bruce doesn't take any lip from Johnny Foreigner, does he?

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    1. Trouble is they will probably both be fined for that touchline spat! Disappointing draw and Rodwell definitely handled the ball on the line.

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