5 April 2016

Cowsick

To the south west of Sheffield there's an area where I have walked many times. One of its principal attractions is that it is less than ten minutes by car from our house. On Sunday I was back there once again - intent on completing a three mile hike that would test out my sore right hip. 

I found myself walking across a rough, boggy area. Half way across, heading north west to Strawberry Lee Wood, the bepuddled muddy path reaches a long paved section which you can see in the picture below:-
What a relief that was and I supposed that the paving slabs prevent damage to the adjacent bog but I might have been wrong about that.

Later, back at home with map in hand I was amused to discover that the rough boggy area is called "Cowsick". What an odd name and it is a mystery where that name came from or how old it is. While researching this, I stumbled across a blog that is entirely devoted to Blacka Moor with a lot of reference to Cowsick Bog in it. The author was not at all happy that those paving stones now cross this natural landscape. I admire and applaud his passionate interest in and defence of Blacka Moor and Cowsick. The world needs more eco-warriors though I very much doubt that the erudite blogger in question would appreciate such a label.

18 comments:

  1. Having traversed a bog or two in my day, let me just say that I would welcome paving stones! Maybe it's called cowsick because the cattle ate things there that made them sick, or it was an environment that sickened them. Hoof rot or something. Just a guess.

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    1. Some believe that your first notion is what led to the name. You could have done with some paving slabs on Crosby beach!

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  2. I never thought that I would find the link to that person who only blogs about the bog to be more interesting than your walk with me. That person has averaged a blog per day since 2007. Thats about 2900 posts. About the same wildlife and grasses and the sky above Blacka Moor. And, I think my life on the top of Centaur Mountain is mundane!

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    1. Hell. I didn't realise he was such a prolific blogger Mama Thyme! So if he can do it - so can you!

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  3. Okay, my guess for what it's worth. Cows got sick in this area! Make sense?

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  4. Oh dear and I was just thinking how attractive that path was and how handy if there is bog underneath.

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    1. At least the second syllable was "sick" and not another farming word beginning with "s".

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  5. Not really the sort of address you'd want as a letterhead is it !

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  6. ...and maybe the cows got sick of falling in the bog.
    Lovely paving stones - they would like nice in my garden....

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    1. There are quite a few moorland paths like that in The Peak District CG. Often they are carried in by helicopters.

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  7. Maybe that's were Mad Cow's Disease raised its ugly head and made the cows sick.

    Now, on the other hand, Strawberry Lee Wood has a certain ring to it, wouldn't you agree?

    I think the paving slabs are a good idea...but what would I know! Perhaps some strawberry runners could be planted along side them!

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    1. There is a definite contrast between the two names isn't there?

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  8. The path of paving stones looks irresistible to me! I hope it does not cause any damage to the bog; on the contrary, I can imagine that it keeps ramblers to this very limited area instead of them spreading out all across the place, disturbing birds and plants as they tread on everywhere with their hiking boots.
    How did your sore hip react to the 3 mile hike?

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    1. The hip certainly did not feel worse after that walk. Thanks for asking Meike.

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  9. The Cowsick Bog eco-warrior would probably prefer nobody at all walked over 'his' bog but the paving stones serve more than one purpose - they keep peoples' feet dry, help prevent the bog from turning into a sink-hole and are a great help to the tramping Pudding and his hip problem.

    Ms Soup

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    1. The author of that blog is so passionate about the area. I think he would like all sheep and cattle to be kept away. He sees them as alien invaders.

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