22 January 2017

Lazybones

Sunlight on Agden Reservoir
A lazy Sunday morning and a lazy blogpost. All I'm going to do is is share some more pictures from my Friday walk in the parish of Bradfield. It was a brief interlude in the greyness which is back again this morning even though the pesky weather forecasters predicted sunshine.
On the edge of Low Bradfield I came across this disused building. I thought it was an old barn but then I spotted an early nineteenth century plaque above one of the doors. It reads like this "1826/ Rebuilt at the Curate's sole cost./Nemo soli sibi natus". Translated, the Latin phrase means "Nobody is born alone". Why would such a plaque appear on a barn? I have been unable to solve this riddle. (Later - see update below)
 Below, a bridge takes Smallfield Lane over the point where Rocher End Brook  meets the reservoir.
 Above, a bright contrail is reflected on the surface of the reservoir which, because of the wooded hillside to the west is now shrouded in shadow.
 Above, another view of Boot's Folly which dates from 1927. It was built under the instructions of the landowner to keep his men in gainful employment during The Great Depression. Below, a ruined farm building near Low Bradfield - especially for Meike in Ludwigsburg, Germany. In fact, I hereby name it The Meike Building...
UPDATE re. the plaque at Bradfield
I wrote to the secretary of The Bradfield Historical Society and he kindly e-mailed me back...
"The inscription in Latin and it is my understanding that it goes back to the time before there was a Rector at Bradfield St. Nicholas and a Curate would come either from Hathersage or Ecclesfield and was put up for the night or couple of days at Fair House Farm and in recompense for his stay/keep at the farm gave money for the building of the barn at his own expense"

36 comments:

  1. That top photo of the reservoir is very atmospheric. The plaque is interesting, I wonder what the story is behind that.

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    1. Thanks Sue. I like that saying... "Nobody is born alone". I also wish I knew the history of the plaque.

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  2. Oh, thank you, Neil! I feel most honoured to have a building named after me!
    How intriguing about the 1826 building. Will you do more research, maybe talk to someone from the church where possibly records are kept which could throw some light on this mystery?
    It's sunny and bright, but very cold, here. We're about to go for a walk, see if Lake Monrepos is frozen over.

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    1. Be careful on the ice! You might slip through and then the name of your blog would have to change to "From My Mental Freezer".

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  3. Again wonderful photos. My first thought when I saw the one at the top was: Greetings from Rebecca?

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    1. Please explain Beech. I don't know what Greetings from Rebecca means...

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    2. A photo full of mystic dim light, it reminded me of Daphne du Maurier's book immediately.

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    3. Ah, now I understand Beech. I thought it might be that.

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  4. I am going to try to address your riddle in a post of my own. Stay tuned and keep your eyes peeled or pealed or whatever it is one is supposed to do with one's eyes.

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    1. I have e-mailed the secretary of the Bradfield Historical Society about this matter and hope to get a reply. In the meantime, I will be interested to pore over your response/solution.

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  5. From my Latin knowledge (done up to university standard as a subsid with German) I'm wondering if it rather means "nobody is born for himself alone". In other words, we are here on earth to do good to others, hence the curate's generosity.

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    1. Thank you ADDY. You may be right about the subtle difference in translation but why would a curate pay to have a barn rebuilt? I could understand a curate paying for a school room or a shelter for the destitute but why a barn?

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  6. Aren't we lucky living in such a photogenic Yorkshire?

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    1. Of course we are Mrs Weaver. It's God's own county.

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  7. So with some research and correct info some things can make a lot of sense.

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    1. Mystery can be a nice thing but our appetite for truth is stronger.

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  8. I was intrigued with the idea of the tower in the middle of nowhere, wondering what it's purpose would be, so i looked it up.
    I found an hilarious line in the Wiki entry: There was a spiral staircase to the top, but this was removed some years ago after a cow climbed the stairs and became stuck.

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    1. I have been inside the tower. It is true that you can't get up to the upper floors. The ground floor is now just a place where sheep shelter.

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  9. It's great that you received a reply to your email. Unfortunately, so often similar doesn't happen.

    Love your photos. You had a lazy Sunday, and so did I. I watched the tennis players at the Aus Open expend all the energy for me. Still this week to go , and then I can hang up my racquets!

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    1. Poor old Murray! This was a big chance to win the Aussie Open. He may not get a better chance in the future.

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    2. I've never been a fan of Murray. He's a sook.

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    3. sook - An Australian slang term used to indicate another person is soft, easily upset, or just a plain pussy.

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  10. Beautiful photos, every one. You made good use of the break in the weather.

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  11. Your photos are always wonderful. I'm glad you had a nice, lazy Sunday. I had a blah, busy day at work.

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    1. You mean you didn't go to church? Tut-tut Jennifer!

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  12. I'm glad Addy gave an explanation for the inscription - it had made me curious and that translation does make more sense. Of course no-one is ever born alone as their mother is usually present!

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    1. At my birth, there was also a donkey, a sheep, three shepherds and three wise guys from the East. My father said, "How the hell did this happen love?" but my Mum just smiled knowingly.

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  13. It always seems sad to me when buildings fall into disrepair and remain unused. Lovely pics again YP.

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    1. Yes. Melancholy echoes hand around such buildings like ghosts.

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  14. Interesting history of that building (and great pictures, as always). Do you think I could find a curate to temporarily house in exchange for some real estate??

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    1. Yes I do. Write to The Curate of St Paul's Cathedral outlining your request.

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  15. A lazy comment

    Zzzzzzzzzz

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    1. At least you're not snoring.

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  16. Now that I've caught up with all your posts I shall concentrate on the first photo of this post. I think it is superb even though it looks more like a moonlight photo.

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    1. Thanks Graham. I snapped a dozen similar pictures across the reservoir but that one was in my judgement the best.

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