30 October 2017

Autumntime

On the southwestern edge of this city, a stream runs down from the moors before meeting The River Sheaf. It's called The Limb Brook and where it passes Whirlow Brook Hall a woodland path follows its course. It's a nice route to walk - especially on a sunny Sunday afternoon in autumntime.

Two years ago I snapped a pleasing photograph in The Limb Valley. Go here. Yesterday, as the sun was shining I  grabbed my camera and headed back there hoping to bag some more great shots.

Some mighty trees shadow the path like classical pillars. A few other people were out and about. A couple of runners in their fluorescent tops, a few dog walkers, a chatterbox family., a pair of young lovers. From afar, I "used" some of them in my pictures.

Here's a selection. They can be enlarged with a click:-

Bracket fungi on a dead tree

27 comments:

  1. Sorry - this will be another very boring comment from me. But I can not say anyhting but "great pictures" when I see such great pictures!

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    1. It may be a boring comment but I am always happy when my pictures meet with your approval Meike.

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  2. I have always had a love of walking in deciduous forests particularly on days like that portrayed. On the other hand I cannot enter a coniferous forest on my own without terrible feelings of foreboding. So I rarely do.

    As I have now caught up and read your pists since my last visit I shall just make a few comments here.

    Billion: Thank you. I used to fish off the rocks with a carbon fibre rod or from a boat using lines and feathers. Sometimes I fished for trout. I've just been contemplating what to do with some cane rods that I inherited but have never used.

    Help: I would have chosen 2 or 5. Which is odd in that no on else did.

    Liminal: Is a word I have used for decades when referring to the area between the sea and the land. Useful as it appears in crosswords regularly. I have added the rather beautiful words of your poem to my note which has your August poem in it.

    Hardwick: What a beautiful lady you are married to.

    Warning: "By the way, the lad is afflicted by mild cerebral palsy." I'm not quite sure that I see the relevance of that in relation to the 'charges' against him.

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    1. Regarding "Warning" I was just making the point that people with cerebral palsy are often wired differently. Thanks for catching up with my posts and welcome back to The Land of Blog.

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  3. It looks like Hampstead Heath! Apparently we were all in the woods yesterday!

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    1. You can't beat the woods in autumn sunshine.

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  4. Beautiful photos, reminds me of the woodland walks here in France.

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    1. I didn't see and wild boars or big brown dogs pretending to be bears.

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  5. That could be a local walking path--amazing how similar it is.

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    1. I meant, of course, local to me.

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    2. Please tell me the name of the town where you live Jenny. I have forgotten.

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    3. You haven't forgotten because I never say which town :) But there are many, many places in my province (Nova Scotia) that look like this. Before the last supercontinent broke apart, all our country and yours were in approximately the same place, or so scientists say, so it's easy to see why there are such similarities. And did you know that Nova Scotia is Latin for "New Scotland"? Apparently it looked similar to Old Scotland. I'm sure you probably know all that as you seem to have an admirable grasp of geographical and historical knowledge.

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    4. I wonder why you keep the name of your town secret. You must have lots of jewels. And you are right I did know what Nova Scotia means.

      Yarmouth? Dartmouth? Sydney? Amherst?

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  6. The post, the earlier linked post and poem, these photos, all balm to the soul. I was lucky enough to escape from my office early today, picked up my brother's two "characterful" Jack Russell terriers and with my own calmer Bedlington, thoroughly enjoyed an hour up our own local woods in amazing light conditions, before the sun went down behind "my" hill. We even had one of the local buzzards leading the way for about 2 minutes under the canopy of trees along our path. Unfortunately, none of my mobile phone camera "snaps" made the cut!

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    1. That sounds like a great escape Andrea. Thanks for dropping by... Maybe you should escape from the office more often.

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  7. One blogger I follow always says if you want good photo opportunities , go for a walk.

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    1. Nope. Try Smitten Image. Awesome blog.

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    2. Okay Red. I know this blog isn't awesome.

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  8. The tracks are not dissimilar to some around this area here.

    It's still spring here...with summer not far away...we had a taste of summer over the past couple of days.

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    1. Did it taste like honey?

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    2. No....more like hot chilli, Yorkie.

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  9. Now there's a path made for walking.

    Alphie

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  10. Lovely. It's hard to beat an English wood.

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    1. Especially when that wood is in the shape of a cricket bat and we are slogging Aussie bowlers all over The Gabba.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.