27 April 2018

Circularity

Yesterday, my silver friend Clint carried me beyond Doncaster. I was heading for the flat lands north of that historical South Yorkshire town. It is not an area I know well and in fact yesterday's planned walking route was all in virgin territory - though I didn't spot any virgins apart from the spring lambs shown in the picture above.
I parked in the sleepy village of Thorpe-in-Balne where there are several new houses of manorial proportions. They had wrought iron gates and CCTV warning signs. The old village must have been very small indeed, dominated by a moated manor house dating back to at least the twelfth century.

I set off and soon found an imposing highland cow guarding the public footpath. I had to nip over the adjacent wooden fence to avoid this horned creature with its ginger Beatles fringe. Then through the fields to the even smaller village of Trumfleet.
The landscape is criss-crossed with drainage channels and the area is vulnerable to flooding. Some of my trudging was on very quiet single track lanes rather than upon cross country paths. I diverted to Wrancarr Mill where an Alsatian in a pen barked at me like The Hound of the Baskervilles. Thank heavens for wire fencing.
Wrancarr Mill
My intended route was a big six or seven mile circle. I knew I would have to cross the main Doncaster to York railway line but that was okay because my map showed two public rights of way crossing the railway tracks near Thorpe Grange Farm.
However, when I got there I discovered that both crossing points had been officially rescinded and the gates were padlocked. Sugar! What was I to do? Retracing my steps would add four miles to my ramble. Instead, I found a place where I could climb over the fencing onto the railway track and then clamber over the other side to get onto the old farm track I had planned to follow.

The weather was delightful yesterday afternoon and it was uplifting to see this unknown area emerging from my ordnance survey map into interesting and visible reality. I was quite weary when Clint welcomed me back into the driver's seat before taking me homewards via the M18 motorway.
Gates to a grand house in Thorpe-in-Balne

33 comments:

  1. It all looks so picturesque!
    The locked gates had me worried for a moment there....

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    1. Nothing stands in the way of The Mighty Yorkshire Pudding!

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  2. Obviously I have no idea why the rights of way over the railway had been rescinded but if it was on safely grounds it seems to me that it would almost certainly lead some people to an even greater risk. I'm glad you avoided the extra 4 miles.

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    1. It was only when I reached the railway track that I found that both rights of way had been closed. I really didn't want to scale that fence but I am glad I did.

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  3. It does look like Ringo Starr!
    Mother duck with her nine little ducklings - that is so very cute indeed!
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. I think he would make a better drummer than Ringo Starr Maria!

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  4. That all looks so idyllic.

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    1. "...in England's green and pleasant land"

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  5. Pedigreed British Blondes indeed!! And those cute little ducklings.... and that daft pony standing in the water.

    Another walk off crossed off the list.

    Alphie

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    1. Pedigree British Blondes? It's where they farm bimbos and swimwear models. I could hear them whinnying in the barn.

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  6. How I love your walks! You live in such a beautiful and peaceful area. I have never seen a long haired cow.

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    1. I am pleased that you joined me on my walk Bonnie. You didn't need to be so frightened when we crossed the railway track!

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  7. Lovely walk, Mr. Pudding. I tried to make friends with the horned cow just now but I can tell you that he wasn't up to a chat! Why do the spring lambs have blue on them? It does look like a lovely spring day. Yesterday, I planted seeds in the greenhouse whilst in a coat and cap and with snow falling outside.

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    1. The lambs have blue on them because the farmer has sprayed identification numbers on them. From what you said before, this should be your last spring up on the mountain. You will be basking in sunshine next spring - surrounded by spring flowers.

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  8. You saw many interesting things and overcame obstacles (literally) - a great afternoon. Thank you for the photos.

    Do people not mind walkers going through what is really their backyards? Are the footpaths on public land? It's very different from here, where the only public land is, to my knowledge at least, in parks and along the shore.

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    1. We have many ancient paths that cross farmland and may indeed pass through people's properties. Some don't like it but we ramblers have the law and history on our side.

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    2. We are the same as jenny_o stated with the only public walks being nature trails in parks and nature preserves. I would love to be able to just head out and follow ancient paths as you do in England! That is amazing to me that you have the same paths people have used throughout history.

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    3. I might make a blogpost about our paths. England is blessed with them and I have not seen a silmilar network of paths anywhere else in Europe. Our mapping organisation - Ordnance Survey - really aids public access.

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  9. Interesting adventure. I was worried that in crossing the fence you would get hung up by the pant leg and then I thought you might catch your shoe on a rail and be run over by the next train But you made it!

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    1. Thank you for your concern Red. The trains surge by at up to 150mph but I looked both ways.

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  10. A very pleasant ramble. I'm glad Clint was still patiently waiting your return.

    A few years ago a property around the corner and along the road a bit from here where I live in my little cabin, there used to be a couple or so Highland cows (and probably a bull, too). Fascinating-looking beasts...

    And no...not one of the Highland cows was me. (I thought I'd slip that in before you did....I know the thought had entered your mind and your fingers were lingering impatiently over your keyboard)!!

    Great photos, again, Yorkie. :)

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    1. You mistake me madam. I do not think of you as a Highland cow but as a timid deer - rather like Bambi's mother before she was shot by the hunter.

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    2. How can you live with yourself, Mr. Pud? lol

      Your insincerity is brighter than the headlights the poor deer keeps getting caught in! ol

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    3. Dear oh dear! I can live with myself because I am never disturbed by my own snoring. By the way, where is Bambi?

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    4. In the forest...

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  11. What an adventure! I feel tired out now.
    I love your photographs, you have a real talent. Thank you.

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    1. The light was gorgeous. If I had taken the same pictures on a grey day I doubt that you would have been impressed Christina.

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  12. Love those gates! Wow -- the Beatles AND Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. You are full of cultural references today, Mr Pudding!

    Those lambs aren't virgins. I can see it in their eyes.

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    1. Eh? I do not recall making a Conan Doyle reference. Please advise.

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  13. I'm glad you avoided that bovine creature. It looks pretty much like a bull to me.

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    1. It was so hairy I couldn't see if had any of those bulbous things handing down - I can't remember what they are called.

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  14. Looks wonderful, just the kind of walk I would like, except for the blocked footpaths. And, perhaps the fancy houses which are full of people who are so grand they don't like to imagine the possibility of ordinary folk being able to call...

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    1. It seems that a lot of wealthy people like to secure their homes like castles so that poorer folk cannot get close. Maybe they have things to hide.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.