4 April 2018

Martin

Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King Jr was brutally assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. The night before, at The Mason Temple, also in Memphis, he had delivered his moving "I've Been to The Mountaintop" speech:-

"Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!"

Fifty years have passed. On this significant day, let us salute the great man. He left  us far too early but his powerful legacy of hope and freedom has not departed.

Has anyone here seen my old friend Martin?
Can you tell me where he's gone?
He freed a lot of people
But it seems the good die young.
I just looked around and he was gone.

25 comments:

  1. He was an extraordinary man. Had he lived, just think what else he might have done. Thank you for this moving post, YP.

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  2. Yes, I followed Martin Luther King and was horrified when he was killed. However, I did not know the song was about Martin Luther King.

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    1. And Abraham Lincoln, John and Bobby Kennedy.

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  3. He was truly a man of God with great wisdom and insight. It was almost like he knew what the next day would bring.

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    1. Yes. You have that sense though he knew that his life was always in danger

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  4. The Sixties certainly brought many changes with them...many tragedies over-shadowed the decade...far too many.

    The 60s brought much change - some good; some bad....

    The Sixties also produced some wonderful music...including Dion's "Abraham, Martin and John"...which is partly quoted in your post.

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    1. Thanks for calling by and sharing your reflections Lee.

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  5. 50 years on, I feel that the promised land is still a long way off for African Americans but it might be getting closer. He certainly moved things forward

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    1. He gave them hope when it was in very short supply.

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  6. I listened to a radio program this week, the subject was Martin Luther King and the Poor Peoples Campaign which brought him to Memphis at that time. He was speaking to sanitation workers about improving their pay and conditions, both of which were appalling. He was a tireless worker for his people.

    Alphie

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    1. A visionary and a soldier for Change. No wonder that racist people in high places wanted him dead.

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  7. He was indeed a great man.

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    1. I can understand his greatness far more easily than the greatness of Stephen Hawking.

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  8. I remember Martin Luther's assassination and the impact that it had across the world. I know that a great deal has improved in terms of apartheid but how much better the world is for black people in America I don't know. I'm not even sure it's that much better for certain socio-economic groups in the UK.

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    1. I think Martin would share your concerns. There's still such a long way to go.

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  9. It seems that anyone who wants to do good for the world gets bumped off doesn't it?
    Briony
    x

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    1. That might be why David Cameron and Trump have not been bumped off.

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  10. I was not yet 2 weeks old when Martin Luther King was murdered, so I can not remember anything about the actual event. But of course we were taught about him at school, and I agree with what others here have said; he was a man who gave people hope. And even though he has been dead for half a century now, he still keeps giving.
    On a more pessimistic note (usually not my style), it looks like humans as a species have not learned a thing since then.

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    1. I think that the general lot of black people in America has improved significantly though they have not reached the promised land. I think that Dr King would turn in his grave to see the many injustices that continue.

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  11. I have always, always felt that he knew he was going to be killed....and soon. He knew. And, he knew which of the esteemed organizations in our government was paying to have it done. When James Ray pled guilty, the trial stopped. No further information was needed from him. And, although from that day forward, he said that he was not guilty, no additional inquiries were initiated by the FBI.

    Somehow, Martin knew. To my dying day, I will always miss Martin and Bobby. We all lost so much.

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    1. With the benefit of hindsight, taking on board all that has happened since April 1968, it seems almost inconceivable that the American state was not involved in Martin's assassination. They had worked so hard to discredit him before his death.

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