12 October 2018

Details

You might not wish to accompany me on an urban walk as I am always pointing my camera at things. You'd be yelling, "For heaven's sake Pudding! Let's move along mister!" But I wouldn't care. Though I have now reached the grand old age of sixty five, my eyes are still filled with childlike wonder - an insatiable appetite for the endless eye-catching images I see around me.

How should one capture London in a group of photographs? Perhaps Big Ben, Buckingham Palace, The London Eye, Tower Bridge and The Shard? Or maybe it's better to drill down and record little things - the details of the city. Yes - perhaps that's the way - to discover the essence of a place through details that are so often overlooked.

Up at the top of this post there's a lion's head from the facade of The Alexandra Palace near Wood Green and below a box of heritage tomatoes I spotted at the farmers' market in the adjacent park.
Above - as we were walking through Ravenscourt Park on Tuesday morning, I looked up to the leafy canopy above - painted in gorgeous autumn sunlight. Below, a young seabird explores the edge of The River Thames near Albert Wharf, Hammersmith. I like the way she is reflected in the water as she seeks nourishment before nightfall.
Above - in The Rose Garden at Alexandra Palace there's a fountain with carved lion heads on each face of the supporting column. I was attracted by the green algal growth on one of those heads. Below - this picture was taken in Kew Gardens from beneath the incredible "Hive" structure designed by Wolfgang Buttress for the Milan Expo of 2015. There's a man standing in the very heart of the structure and he has no idea that I am beneath him pointing my camera towards the sky.
Finally, this is The Dutch House at Kew Palace. On the lawn in front of it there's a sturdy bronze sundial like a sail upon a circular pool of water.

22 comments:

  1. Every single photograph here is lovely.

    I'll never see a sundial again without thinking of the podcast "S-town". You should check it out sometime, Neil. It's fascinating and sundials are a big part of the (true) story.

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    1. That might be my very first podcast! But where will I find it? Cast out with pea pods?

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  2. A nice collection of shots. Looking closely, I can see that the gull is fixing her feathers on the other side of her head, using the water as a mirror. She expected you would wait for her to be ready for her glamour shot, but Nooooo, you had to take it while she was still primping :)

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    1. Your criticism of my hastiness is deserved.

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    2. What?? Who are you and what have you done with the real YP??

      ha ha

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  3. I love your Hive photo, and the lions with the algae is both wonderful and disgusting. (What's in that water causing all that algal growth, one wonders?!)

    sidewalk
    sidewalk
    sidewalk
    sidewalk

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    1. Yes "Sidewalk" - it's a well-known biological weapon that promotes rapid algal growth in fresh water sources.

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  4. I love your photographs - they're ones I would be taking, too. I no longer take walks and seldom take photos any more. I'm reduced to using my cell phone for those. But I still see them everywhere, and have to store the mentally. Fortunately, I see that my children are starting to "see" many of the same things I do. And that's gratifying!

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    1. I am pleased that this batch of photos caused you to reflect upon your own relationship with imagery Mary.

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  5. These are great, Neil! The one of the "Hive" with the man who didn't know you were there is maybe the one that appeals to me most of this lot, but it is hard to really choose a favourite.
    Yes, cities are so much more than just the well-known landmarks. They are made of scents and sights and sounds, all at slightly different angles for everybody who lives or visits there.

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    1. Thanks for calling by once again Meike and for leaving another pleasant and encouraging comment. I hope you have a nice weekend.

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  6. Details are okay but somehow they have to be put together to show the big picture. I wouldn't get the idea of London from photos even if the Pudding took them . London has been branded a long time ago.

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  7. The algae growth on the fountain gives life to the lion.

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    1. I found that image both fascinating and horrible.

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  8. You are just getting too old for me, Mr. Pudding. But as long as you take me on great walks, I can't complain. Now, take care of those knees for at least the next year.

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    1. The knees are holding up nicely at present but I still remember the limping months when long walks were out of the question. Thanks for calling by again my little Colorado blue columbine.

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  9. No use for a sundial here at present...we're receiving rain, beautiful rain. So I will rely on my little clock if I need to know the time. I know the sun rose this morning, even if it is hidden...and will set later this afternoon...even if it is still hidden.

    Some areas on Thursday, however, received much damage from a wild hailstorm and tornado ripped through their areas. So much devastation to buildings/homes; and crops almost ready for picking were wiped out. Heartbreaking for those concerned.

    A nice array of photos, Yorkie.

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    1. Until you mentioned the fierce storm I was feeling happy that rain had fallen on your colonial outpost Ms George. Thanks for dropping by once more.

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  10. Brilliant photos. Your mastery with the camera is oustanding Mr Pudding.

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    1. You are very kind Sue. Are you after money?

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  11. I like the fountain! that really stands out to me.

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