22 June 2022

Supplement

More pictures from Tuesday's walk in The East Riding of Yorkshire. I am particularly pleased with the photo shown above. It's very simple. I am standing near Barmston Main Drain looking back towards Barmston. The quality of light and associated colours speak clearly of the month of June. Can you see how the land rises near the woods - to the left of the path through the wheat field? That's Trusey Hill - a place where Vikings were buried. Viking invasions began around 800AD and their control of eastern England lasted for two hundred and fifty years.

The picture below was taken from the village of Barmston looking north towards Hamilton Hill.

Below, back on Ulrome Sands. This image shows the crumbly nature of boulder clay cliffs. No wonder there's no vegetation there. It just doesn't have time to get established before more stormy waves chew upon the coast.
I saw this cow parsley growing on the cliff edge above Barmston Sands.
Close by, I spotted this concrete pillbox in a field of barley. It will be a few years yet before coastal erosion causes this one to plunge to the beach as it is set back fifty or sixty yards from the cliff edge.

23 comments:

  1. Lots of open country there. Just like the Canadian prairies.

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    1. Except we don't have any prairie dogs.

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  2. My preferred photo is the one with the solitary tree, a subject you often seem to find. I'd not thought about it before but farmers would be losing valuable land to the erosion. There is a change of soil type somewhere that won't erode as quickly, but I wonder how far inland it might be.

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    1. Just north of Bridlington Bay is a rocky promontory called Flamborough Head. It is much tougher for the sea to erode because it is made of chalk. It is the end of The Yorkshire Wolds that curve inland. From that boulder clay cliff the more solid rock would be twenty five miles inland.

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  3. You are right, the first picture is a perfect representation of June in this part of the world. Beautiful! The second photo also has a strong appeal. Of course, they are all good.
    I love the place names of Norse or Viking origin in Yorkshire. Thirsk, for instance, and then of course all the ones ending on -by.

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    1. I myself am of Viking stock and even my surname ends with -by.

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  4. Fifty or sixty yards? It's probably got a couple of decades left. I'm currently reading a book about the Viking invasions titled The Viking Heart, subtitle How Scandinavians Conquered the World. With my Scandinavian ancestry I like to tell myself I am a Viking therefore able to withstand anything. (in truth I am a bit wimpy)

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    1. I am of Viking stock but even I can be wimpy River - especially when they are showing hospital operations on the television.

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  5. I love the first one so much. I find pictures of a path or a view framed by an open door so interesting!
    I think it's the curiosity in me. (Or nosiness!)

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    1. Who knows where the path might lead, just like the one you and your husband-to-be took to Darwen Tower?

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    2. Blimmin herry! You have a good memory!
      It's been shrouded in scaffolding and sheeting for months but it's on show again. A bit of restoration was needed.

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  6. Excellent photos, as always YP. The path in the first one is such a strong invitation to follow and explore what lies ahead.
    Ulrome sands don't look particularly appealing, even on a sunny day.

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    1. From Ulrome Sands one could go skinny dipping and probably not be seen. Then one could dry off in the sunshine like a beached seal. The photo does not justice to the beach - just the cliffs.

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  7. Excellent photos as always.

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  8. Lovely photos. That first one literally pulls you in.

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    1. That first image seems so right. Thanks Bob.

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  9. You do know how to frame a photo, YP! Great shots as always. I wonder who owns the land that's being slowly consumed by the ocean? How must that feel, knowing that your investment is slowly vanishing and there's not a thing to be done about it?

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    1. It must feel bad but not as bad as you would feel if your tractor or harvester plunged to the beach. Thanks for your kind comment on my picture taking - always appreciated from a master photographer like your good self Steve.

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  10. These are beautiful. Thank you for sharing and explaining.

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  11. You and my husband are both from Viking stock then. Lovely photos.

    As for Simon, nothing you can really do then. He's already decided he's dead and refuses to live for what time he was left. My father was the same. He had open heart surgery when he was 55 and then read somewhere it only last for about ten years, this was back in the '70's. At 65 he started waiting to die. Took him another nine years to die and every Christmas he would tell my mum, this could be my last Christmas. I did point out to my mum that eventually he would be right.
    My dad finally died when he was 79, none the happier for the extra 24 years he got from his open heart surgery. He outlived all his brothers who all died in their sixties.

    I don't want to life like that and yet some times I feel a bit of my father in me. Life should be more than waiting for the end.

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    1. How sad that your father had a cloud hanging over the last twenty four years of his life. He could have relished them but I guess we cannot help who we are and how we see things. Some people are naturally light-hearted and positive - seeing the best in everything.

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Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.

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