15 December 2011

Dodger

When I board a train, I am in possession of the appropriate ticket. In this Scotrail scene, a student fare dodger is confronted by a guard who is clearly old enough to be the lad's grandfather. Seeing the difficulty the guard is in, a passenger, 35 year old Alan Pollock from Stirling, gets up to lend a hand and hurls the nineteen year old lad, complete with Tibetan yak breeder's hat, off the train onto Linlithgow station platform.

Most right thinking people would expect "Big Man" Alan Pollock to receive some kind of medal but instead he faces the prospect of a court appearance - potentially charged with assault upon the poor, unfortunate fare dodger who typically refuses to accept that he was in the wrong. What a topsy turvy world we are living in when wrongdoers can gain the upper hand while brave, community-minded citizens like Alan Pollock find themselves accused of wrongdoing.

This is what David from Manchester had to say about the incident in yesterday's "Daily Mail": "Surely this was simply the 'Big Man's' interpretation of Cameron's 'Big Society'. Quite frankly, this kid's Dad would do him more of a favour if he told his son to apologise for his behaviour and then shut up about it." I find myself in agreement with David and The Big Man - Alan Pollock - himself. Instead of spouting off about right and wrong in today's society, more of us should be acting rather than talking and the powers that be should be applauding such courageous action instead of tending to side with so-called "victims" like Sam Main (Tibetan yak breeder).

6 comments:

  1. YP
    I heard the boy's father on the news being interviewed... the guy was angry and full of excuses... but did state that his son HAD the appropriate ticket.....at no time did he mention his son's dreadful language .......
    the acorn does not fall too far from the tree me thinks

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  2. And the whole thing was recorded by one of Main Jnr's college mates so it can be a hit on YouTube. You have to give them ten out of ten for their efforts to offset their student loans.

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  4. For some strange reason, Blogger keeps duplicating my comments. Have I a case for breach of copyright?

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  5. Sadly all too typical of the ridiculous world we live in and one more reason for members of the public to walk by on the other side whenever someone is in need of help. I dread to think how some of these spoilt brats will end up - they are the society of the future - God help us!

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  6. I know a fellow who drove a bus for 40 years, he had lots of tales. This is my favorite:

    Jack (the driver) had a busload of mostly retired ladies, taking them over the summit to Reno to gamble for the day. It was snowing and his attention was on the road until he heard a commotion in the back of the bus. When he looked up he could see that one of the male passengers, a sloppy-looking fellow with long hair, had taken off his clothes and climbed up into the luggage rack. The ladies were disturbed.

    Jack is not very big, but he's from Tennessee, a scrappy fellow who values good manners. He steered the bus to a stopping place and walked back down the aisle. He probably said something like, "You get your sorry ass down outta there and get your clothes on. Don't you have any manners?" The scruffy guy appeared to be on drugs. His reply was, "Make me."

    The only thing the guy was still wearing was a huge chain around his neck, with a shark's tooth on it. So Jack reached up and grabbed the chain, pulled the guy out of the luggage rack, dragged him down the aisle to a chorus of cheering old ladies, and tossed him out the bus door into a snow bank. Where he left him and proceeded to Reno.

    The scruffy guy sued, of course, and the bus company was prepared to just pay him off. But Jack insisted on going to court. He won. Scruffy didn't show up because he had warrants out for his arrest.

    Sometimes the good guys do win.

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