19 March 2018

Icicles

Snow came from the east. Then it went away. Then it came back again. This should be a time of daffodils and crocuses, a time for digging the earth ready for vegetables. Instead, there's snow on our garden once more. Silver Clint, my trusty steed, is wearing a thick white coat and our road is a treacherous ice rink. Clint is going nowhere.
Last night I noticed that icicles were forming above our back door as a wodge of snow slips slowly from our slightly angled kitchen roof. When I emerged from the snug cocoon of our winter quilt this morning I decided to photograph said icicles that have grown a little longer like super-speedy stalactites in a limestone cave.
Like a rainbow, a snowflake, a leaf, a flower-head, a seashell, a mushroom, a berry, a feather - the icicle  is a wondrous and beautiful phenomenon to behold, fashioned by Nature  for our appreciation and delight.

28 comments:

  1. To this day I regret that I never took a picture of the huge icicle that had formed one particularly long and cold winter underneath the railway bridge where I came past on my way to work every morning, before the new West Exit was opened. I am not kidding - it was longer than I am tall, and I admired it every day until it disappeared.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is fortunate that it didn't plunge from the bridge as you were walking under it. I imagine that being speared by a giant icicle is not a nice way to go.

      Delete
  2. And it’s all because of global warming. Please make sense of that one for us, Mr. Pudding.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This March Yorkshire has been suffering from global cooling!

      Delete
  3. I've seen a few icicles around our neighborhood, but I must admit my personal prejudices against this weather preclude my enjoying them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As The Snow Queen might have said - "Open your heart, let the icicles in!"

      Delete
  4. Absolutely fantastic photos Mr pudding.
    I've had enough of snow and winter in General really. Our allotment is either frozen solid or waterlogged. I'm itching to start planting my spuds but will have to be patient.
    Spring can't be far away, surely?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. See this post from April 2012 Christina...
      http://beefgravy.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/26.html
      Snow in April.

      Delete
  5. Link won't work and I can't find it by scrolling through the years.........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Highlight the link then with the cursor hovering over the link address click on your righthand button and then "Go to". This will get you there Christina.

      Delete
    2. ...or simply type "Snow in April" in the search box in the top left corner of the blog, it should take you to the post from April 2012, too.

      Delete
    3. Oh good heavens! I did as Librarian suggested and got a post from April 2016 depicting a dead sheep and a dead hare! Oh woe is me!!! I shall be thinking about these two poor souls for ages now......
      I'm on a kindle maybe this is why it won't work?

      Delete
    4. FOUND IT!
      Hope only your pride was hurt after your fall. I'd have been tempted to call in the Barrel inn for a medicinal brandy.......

      Delete
  6. Che meraviglia! Especially the icicle with the water droplet!
    Greetings Maria x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Was Che Meravigila related to Che Guevarra? Thanks for calling by again Maria.

      Delete
  7. Excellent shots. We used to have huge icicles hanging from the eaves of our house. Most people did. Many years later, I learned it was due to poor insulation. The heat escapes through the ceiling, warms up the roof, melts the snow - which re-forms as ice as it drips off the edge of the roof. Our modern house has no icicles and I rather miss them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nova Scotia without icicles would be like The Sahara Desert without sand.

      Delete
  8. Nice job on the icicles. Somewhere there's a saying, "If the world gives you lemons make lemonade." I think that fits here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do see what you mean Red. Thanks.

      Delete
  9. Refrigerators are definitely not needed there during the current weather!

    Over the years I've noticed in a lot of TV shows emanating from the UK the fridges are only small...particularly in comparison to the size of our fridges down this way.

    Is that the norm in the UK...small, bar-fridge size fridges in kitchens?

    Clever photography, Yorkie. Keep warm!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We have a large fridge with a freezer beneath. It is seven feet tall. That is not uncommon but some people still have small fridges that fit under their counters/work surfaces.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for clarifying that for me.

      Even though there is only me and my two furry rascals to cater for, I love my big fridge (it, too, has the freezer at the bottom), and a small bar-size fridge would never suit me.

      Delete
    3. Fridges in Queensland should be so big that you could sit in them when the temperatures soar.

      Delete
  10. Icicles are so pretty and you have photographed them admirably.

    I hope you soon get to dig in the earth and drive Clint. he must be feeling neglected

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you ever seen icicles in Sydney Kylie?

      Delete
    2. nup, only in photos!

      Delete
  11. I especially like the two photos with the water dripping off the tips. But what on earth is a wodge of snow?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Wodge" is a good word isn't it Mr C? It describes a big chunk or amount of something - in this case snow.

      Delete

Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.