2 March 2018

March

In a corner of our garden there's a concrete girl. Year in and year out she stands there both day and night, rain or shine. Nothing seems to faze her. She always has the same mischievous smile on her concrete face.

Yesterday the snow was even thicker than before. When I went out to feed the birds, I noticed the little concrete girl. She was wearing a hairpiece that would have impressed Marge Simpson. Here she is. She hasn't got a name:-
There was so much snow in our street that I didn't even think about reversing Clint into the road. He remains parked up in front of our house with a good ten inches of snow on his roof. Instead, I donned my snow-gear and set off to The Porter Valley. I aimed for Forge Dam Cafe,looking forward to a big cup of hot chocolate and a toasted teacake.

On the way, I passed a memorial to one of the great figures of Sheffield's proud steel history - Thomas Boulsover (1705 - 1788).  This clever fellow invented Sheffield plate - a process whereby base steel is coated in silver. He used this discovery in the manufacture of millions of metal buttons which made him a very rich man. He went on to produce other specialised metal products including saws and surgical instruments. This was before the arrival of stainless steel which incidentally was also invented in Sheffield by Harry Brearley in 1912.
Thomas Boulsover Memorial
After twenty minutes in the cafe, I set off up the side of the valley towards Bents Green. By now fierce wind was whipping the snow as schoolchildren careered down the slopes on plastic toboggans. I thought of the first toboggan I ever rode - made by my step-grandfather from waste wood, a length of  rope and two strips of steel that acted as runners. Back in my East Yorkshire home village we would have died for just one of the many marvellous sledging hills around Sheffield.

I bought a steak pie in the butcher's  shop at Bents Green. Two and a half hours after setting off from our house I was back with rosy cheeks and a head of hair that bristled with static electricity thanks to my thermal ski hat. The concrete girl's head of hair had grown even taller in her sheltered corner.
Whiteley Woods Bridleway

24 comments:

  1. After many years growing up in North Dakota, I learned not to go outside when the snow was abuilding.

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    1. I guess it gets really cold in ND in the wintertime.

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  2. Sounds like a very pleasant winter day. You did the right thing and just got out and enjoyed the day.

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    1. I had been hoping for some blue sky between the snow clouds Red.

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  3. Beau and Peep the sheep, and Clint your trusty car, have names so why doesn't she the concrete girl, also have a name?
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. You are right. I shall have to think of a name for the concrete girl. Let me see now... Yes, I think the name Maria will suit her fine. I wonder if she has a concrete heart.

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  4. Concrete Girl looks snug in her fluffy white pashmina!
    We loved sledging on the hilly fields around Ludwigsburg when we were kids. There even was a "Death Slope" only the bravest dared to go down. Of course I was one of those, and only hurt my fingers once, never broke a bone there.

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    1. You were a daredevil. You could have represented Germany in The Winter Olympics - the skeleton or luge perhaps. Now, if you don't mind me being so blunt, it's probably too late for you to be an Olympian.

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  5. She looks like the pope. I too had a home made wooden sledge with metal runners. It was extremely heavy but once it started moving it was fast and hard to stop. I nearly killed myself careering towards a dry stone wall.

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    1. Sledging can be very dangerous. It is best to avoid dry stone walls Sue. Remember this if Paul takes you out sledging this weekend.

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  6. A nice post, Yorkie, with interesting history included.

    Trekking through the snow like that you could apply for a job as Santa, and get it.

    I won't go out on rainy days if I don't have to do so...preferring to stay snuggled up inside at home. I'd be like that, even more so, if thick snow covered the ground and roads. As I say often...we're all different.

    Your concrete girl with her concrete heart reminds me in a round-about way of the Elvis song from "GI Blues"...."Wooden Heart"...his love interest in the movie, "Lili" was played by Juliet Prowse.

    "Lili" could be a nice name for your frozen garden girl, but I've just noticed you've solved the problem with Maria; and now we've met a girl named "Maria". :)`

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    1. I hope you are not jealous that I decided not to call our concrete girl Lee. I shall save that cute name up for something else. Besides, I know your heart is not made of concrete.

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  7. Spring is so early here this year we're going to be eating the first strawberries by mid month. I'm not complaining!

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    1. These words SPRING to mind - rubbing, wounds and salt!

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  8. If I was over there I would never eat a pie again because the butcher's would be the last place I would look!

    Sounds like a good day

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    1. With my guidance and intimate cultural knowledge I would gladly help you to survive Kylie. I could also teach you Yorkshireish.

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  9. And you never so much as brought the concrete girl a cup of hot chocolate or a warm coat? Poor thing!

    Are you hurting today from the walk yesterday? I find walking in deep snow like walking in dry sand - uses muscles I didn't realize existed.

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    1. No not hurting at all Jenny. It was only around five miles and on most paths the snow was compacted. Concrete girls are very hardy.

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  10. Sheffield has a proud history and I know that.. it’s a great city. There are so many generations who have benefited from the success of Sheffield stee, for instance.

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    1. It's like most industrial cities. It has a lot to be proud of. All that blood and sweat and all those tears must count for something.

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  11. Love the look of all that snow. Hope the cold weather means that there will still be daffodils in six weeks time ??

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    1. They are hardy plants. Ous were just poking through the soil before the snow came. I think they will recover but this cold has been most unusual.

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  12. She looks like the pope!

    Bravo to you for getting out in this weather. I've pretty much been hunkered down, either at home or at work. Today was finally warm enough to get out and about.

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  13. I do hope you Brits clear up that unusual March weather in time for the Princess and her British consort to have some sunshine and spring temps when they set off for a visit in ten days time.

    There is nothing finer (to me) then to be outside in the falling snow. The absolute quiet on this mountain during a lovely storm is unbelievable!! And the reflection of the moonlight making sparkles on the fresh snow is the most beautiful thing to me!

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