8 December 2020

Galloways

After ordering a replacement valve for our dripping kitchen tap, I noticed that Sheffield's skies were brightening. The weather prophets had obviously got it wrong. 

Very soon I was in Clint's cockpit and heading out of the city. The plan was to have a short walk in that glorious December light and perhaps bag a few photographs too.

Soon I was at the rock climbers' car park at Hook's Car under Stanage Edge. But this time I was heading for a less-visited rocky feature called Carrhead Rocks - across dead bracken and dormant heather. Lord knows why I had not been there before.

Peepo!
As I moved over the rocks I noticed three black and white beasts grazing in the rough moorland below me. They belong to a hardy breed of cattle known as Belted Galloways. When I looped back below Carrhead Rocks, they were hoofing it up to the higher level that I had just walked along.

The light was lovely and I took twenty four pictures of the cattle - five of which I am pleased to share with you in this blogpost. Magnificent creatures that are almost always peaceable but I guess we all have our angry moments, don't we?

"Yes we do!" yelled Clint who was reading my thoughts as I untied my bootlaces. "Now let's go home Roald Amundsen!"



45 comments:

  1. They are rather beautiful!

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    1. I think they prefer the term "handsome" but "beautiful" is also good.

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  2. This old farm boy has never heard of belted galloways. Interesting.

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    1. Did your father raise some cattle Red? What breed?

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  3. They are very beautiful. I especially love their curly hair. Looks like you had a lovely walk.

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    1. It wasn't as long as usual but it was still nice to get out. Ninety minutes later a dark night had arrived.

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  4. I thought you may have released some more livestock.
    They are very unusual and attractive cattle.

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  5. I've seen cattle all my life and I've never seen any like those! They have very unique markings and are really beautiful.

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    1. As they have black heads it can be hard to photograph them successfully but yesterday's light helped me to gather faithful images of them.

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  6. Magnificent weather for a walk in December, I rather envy you that - we have not seen much sun over the past days.
    There were just the three of them? I wonder who they belong to, and whether they spend all year up there.

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    1. Their territory is quite large. They belong to herd of around thirty that are always up there on the moors.

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  7. They look like giant humbugs!

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    1. You have a vivid imagination Christina.

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  8. What beautiful animals. They look very contented and happy to share their home with you - they didn't seem to mind you taking their photograph. Looking at their thick coats it seems they might stay outdoors, no matter what the weather.

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    1. I have seen them huddling together in thick snow.

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  9. They wear their belts so beautifully. I have seen them down in Cornwall on the moors, must be very hardy.

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    1. Lazy farmers must love them as they more or less look after themselves.

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  10. They are indeed very beautiful animals. It seems a shame to eat them.

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    1. Or relationship with farm animals is rather strange isn't it JayCee?

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  11. We call them "Jumper Cows" because they look like they are wearing jumpers. They are a very hard Scottish breed and they need no housing. I inherited some pot ones of my dads. Will post a blog about them.

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  12. ..hardy Scottish breed, even. Saying that I wouldn't argue with them.

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    1. I wonder if they talk with Glaswegian accents: "Och! What are ye feckin' lookin' at jimmy? Ootside!"

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  13. I wonder if they participate in a glass or two of Iron Bru " made from girders."

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    1. Only when they are eating bridies in their local caff.

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  14. You are a great bovine photographer.

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    1. Some people go for weddings and babies but I prefer cattle.

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  15. Those are the most magnificent beasts! I love them and I'm not sure that I've ever either heard of them or seen pictures. Thanks, Mr. P. I do love dramatic photos of gorgeous cattle. And I'm not kidding.

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    1. As I say, they are such peaceful beasts with a calm, unruffled aura about them. What is more they are totally vegan.

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  16. Ah, the belted ones...so magnificent. You did them proud with your photos.

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  17. Excellent shots! I love the one peeping above the bracken.

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    1. With their heads being black they can be hard to capture with a camera but the light was perfect.

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  18. They look like a cross between sheep and black angus. They are really wonderful! We have a couple farmers who raise the Highland cattle, but I've never seen one of these fine fellows. If I ever do, I will try to lure him to follow me home. I will hug him and pet him and I will call him 'Sir Loin'.

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    1. You could put a saddle on him and ride off into the sunset Debby! Giddyup!

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  19. We have a few 'Belties' up here too. They, Highland Cattle and the small Welsh Blacks seem to thrive up here.

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    1. Cattle need to be hardy on Lewis - just like the people.

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  20. I saw a small herd of these Belted Galloways years ago somewhere in our travels. Can't remember where or when but I thought they were wonderful looking creatures even back then. Beautiful pictures, my friend. I love that area of Stanage Edge that you have shown us a time or two. Do you have a map that shows you all the trails in a certain place or do you just "wing" it most of the time? Stay Safe!

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    1. Most of the time I follow designated public footpaths but just occasionally I go "off piste". Thanks for calling by again Donna and if I don't communicate with you again in the next three weeks may I wish you and your cuddly "Big Bear" a very happy Christmas.

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    2. Oh, and I wish you and yours a safe, wonderful holiday, even tho it might be a little quiet. I always drop by every day, my brother, but don't respond as much as I would in the past. Don't know why. Just lazy, I suppose. You and your lovely bride have a lovely Christmas Day!

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    3. It's nice to know you are there Donna. No one should feel any compunction to comment after visiting a new post.

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  21. Their coats look nice and warm, very fashionable colours too. I got rather cold this afternoon out walking, I think I need some thermal underwear.

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    1. ...or a Belted Galloway cape. There's still time for Paul to order one for you before Christmas.

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  22. I thought you were writing about the cough mixture. I was brought up on Galloways every time I was poorly with a cough.

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    1. You are seventy now ADDY. You are remembering a concoction that was sold to the public a long, long, long time before I was born.

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