2 February 2021

Schlepping

Looking west from Stanage Edge to Lose Hill and Win Hill - near High Neb

Yesterday I promised myself a walk and that is what happened. My trusty South Korean steed - Sir Clint - carried me out of the city to Redmires Reservoirs . Long term readers of this humble blog will have been there with me before. It's only three miles west of our house.

Stanage Pole

With boots and fingerless gloves on I schlepped* up to Stanage Pole - a lonesome landmark on the moors. Then along an ancient track to Stanage Edge itself. There I turned north because I was heading for the triangulation pillar on High Neb. I could see it white and tiny on the horizon over a mile away. 

But there was something else before it  in the moorland vegetation - another flash of whiteness. What could it be? I have been up there many times before and I did not recall another white feature. Whatever it was I resolved to take a picture of it.

However, as I drew closer I realised it was a human being. A black man in white robes looking east. There was nobody else within half a mile of us. I wanted to get closer but I was apprehensive. You see, he was spouting forth the word of The Lord. It was a mish-mash of angry words and biblical references pouring out of him in a torrent. 

He was unaware of my presence nearby. Perhaps I should have got closer but the one-sided conversation he was having with The Lord seemed fiery, filled with desperation and anger. It was bloody cold up there. Surely he could have been having his chat with The Lord in a nice warm room. Mind you, the neighbours would probably have been banging on the dividing wall yelling, "Why can't you whisper to The Lord?"

I would have said to him: "There's no point imagining that The Lord will hear you better if you just shout louder because he isn't there. In spite of your so-called 'faith', he never was. It was all just a story. And that's the way it is my friend. Sorry to break it to you."

I lingered by the white pillar for a little while and then turned back, reaching Clint two hours after I had set off. He was snoring in his parking place and some small children in bobble hats were pointing at him and laughing.

Last night, I slept soundly then just before nine o'clock I threw back the bedroom curtains to see this unexpected scene:-

*schlepped  -   If you schlep somewhere you go there with a lot of difficulty or effort.  I thank Steve at "Shadows and Light" for introducing me to the word.

33 comments:

  1. People who shout and spout angry words from the Bible should be avoided at all costs. Especially in the middle of a schlep. What is the Stanage Pole? And the white pillar. And have you considered a breathe rite patch for Clint?

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    1. Stanage Pole is a landmark that once guided travellers across the moorland. It sits on the border between the ancient kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria that preceded England. The pillar is one of thousands around The British Isles - concerned with mapping and surveying the landscape. I shall look into ordering a breathe rite patch for my temperamental silver automobile.

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  2. Schlepping is German and also Yiddish. I use it a lot when I schlepp my vacuum cleaner up 5 flights of stairs. I think I would have given that man a wide berth too in case he vented his spleen at me instead of God.

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    1. "Schlep" sounds like it should be a soft drink - perhaps from "Schweppes".

      "Mmmm... After a workout in the gym, there's nothing better than a bottle of elderflower 'Schlep'! 'Schelp'! - for when the going gets tough!"

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  3. You could have met the Yorkshire Prophet YP? Super photos.

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    1. It might have been Saint Dave..."Oh Lord! Cast out the evil Lancastrians as worms upon a duck pond and let us heretofore live in the light of thy glory!"

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  4. I myself gave up on religion when my Father died a most horrible death, it killed it dead, but I'm all for anyone who gets comfort from it. This man probably felt a whole lot better once he'd got it all out of his system.
    I hope you chased those children off. Clint does not deserve to be ridiculed like that.
    Briony
    x

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    1. I bellowed at the children like an angry bull and then I bellowed at their complaining parents. That's a pleasant country walk they will not forget in a long while Briony. I wonder if The Lord was watching me? ANSWER: No.

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  5. What a different adventure! I wonder with all my heart what had inspired that loud conversation with a god.
    Enjoy the quiet of the snow fall.

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    1. Yes. The snow does deaden sound - absorbing it.

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  6. Your garden looks very picturesque in the snow. Chilly though.

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    1. Unfortunately we cannot see a castle - nor the Irish Sea.

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  7. Schlep is a very useful word! Now you can wow your pals at the pub with that one. LOL

    Very peculiar, the guy praying away his rage. I guess he had to just work it all out somehow. If I were a believer in God, I could see how I'd be frustrated with all the trials we have lately been put through!

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    1. "Praying away his rage"...Yes. That is a good way to put it Steve. You have taught me another word - "sidewalk" which is of course the way in which a crab walks.

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  8. I am currently schlepping through life.......

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    1. Make sure you take some tissues with you then!

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  9. Thanks for explaining Stanage Pole. Cool. I also avoid those making loud noises about faith. I ditched the Catholic church when the nuns told me my Swedish grandparents could not go to heaven because they were Protestant. Even at age 8,it made no sense to me.

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    1. You were a bright kid at eight years old Terry.

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  10. I'm surprised that you are a person supportive of the honours list. An honorary knighthood for a Korean car does seem a bit bourgeois. In other words I couldn't think of anything else to say!

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    1. Sir Graham Edwards has a nice ring to it - for services to Caledonian MacBrayne Ferries.

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  11. You're very wise to avoid the lunatic. Some of these people are in another world.

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    1. He was even scaring the grouse (moorland birds). If there were a God, I would want him to be a happy chap - a bit like Santa Claus.

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  12. Your snow covered garden looks wonderful and certainly conveys cold. What a strange encounter with the man on the hill. He must have been out on day release from his institution.

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    1. If people must have religious belief I wish they would stay quiet about it.

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  13. I once worked for a man who flew airplanes. He navigated his small craft by "omnis", like your triangulation points, only taller, visible from a one or two person aircraft. I cannot find any reference to these omnis, though perhaps I don't know the right words to ask. Whenever he took me on a trip, I was put to looking down for them, though I'm fairly sure he knew where to look more than I.

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    1. How interesting. I never knew that America had such a network facility. Our triangulation pillars were certianly not involved in guiding aircraft - just about surveying the land.

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  14. We occasionally found similar people in the sea in Brighton. People were 'dunked', some shouted oaths into the air, others pretended to be pious. I wonder if they're from the same order?

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  15. I guess you did well in avoiding getting too close to the praying/shouting man. He probably chose that spot for its loneliness and would not have appreciated human company. Whatever it was that plagued him, I hope he felt better afterwards.
    You had another beautiful day for a walk. I miss seeing blue skies - even just about a week of a heavy grey lid of cloud makes it feel as if we've not seen the sun properly for ages.

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    1. If that is what religion does to you I am glad I have been an atheist since the age of ten.

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    2. It's never done that to me so far, but of course I have led a sheltered life without much drama and don't know how I'd react under extreme pressure.

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  16. "Sir" Clint - he was Knighted in the New Year's Honours? Congratulations, but what a shame if it was this year and you didn't have chance to go to the Palace! Those children would surely have been more polite had they known of Clint's title, and superior social standing...
    Perhaps that "God Botherer" (as my father used to refer to those of an excessively pious nature) had been dumped there by someone who was fed up with his ranting!
    Lovely blue skies - you chose another good day for your walk, YP.

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    1. You were being rather comedic today CG! I haven't heard the term "God botherer" in years! I can say with full confidence that God will never be bothered by me. I wondered why he sent COVID-19.

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