28 February 2021

Gorgeous

View to Abney Low and Abney Barn

What a gorgeous day Sunday February 28th was in this corner of Planet Earth. After breakfast and a shower, I commanded Clint to take me to the village of Grindleford. Then we ascended Sir William Hill and he parked himself four hundred yards short of the telecommunications mast.

I had planned a leisurely three  mile  walk in the early spring sunshine - giving me plenty of time to get home to prepare our Sunday dinner. It was so pleasant up on Eyam Moor that it was not long before I  started to regret wearing my big coat.

View from Eyam Moor to  Higger Tor

On my way to Grindleford, I had observed many cars parked in the north Derbyshire countryside. Hundreds of people were out and about enjoying the lovely day - walking, cycling, rock climbing. If the COVID police had arrested them all they could have filled a football stadium with miscreants.

Sir William Hill telecommunications mast and an old grouse butt

British government guidance says that we should only exercise "locally" but what does that mean? Clarification has suggested that "local" means your village, town or urban neighbourhood. If that really is the case, then no cars at all should be parked out in the countryside. The "law" is being disregarded so widely that it is in effect unenforceable. Meanwhile, PM Johnson whizzes up and down the country visiting hospitals, laboratories, factories and schools to garner as many photo-opportunities as possible. He also greets strangers with elbow pumps thereby breaking the two metre rule.

This is a mad world. It's vital to get out for exercise and what can be better than a healthful walk in the countryside?

View to Win Hill from Eyam Moor

42 comments:

  1. Aye, the third and fourth weeks in February can be a tonic.
    Smashing photos !
    Haggerty

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  2. Lovey countryside. Is that break in the wall a stile? If not, what?

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    1. Yes. It is a "squeeze stile" for shepherds Joanne. People can get through the wall but not sheep.

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  3. Yes, walk in the countryside with lots of ups and downs. Yes, it's good that all those people are out in the countryside.

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    1. There's very little chance of transmitting the virus.

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  4. The grouse butt is interesting and it looks like a very fine day out.
    It seems strange that you have a two metre rule and ours is 1.5 metres. Maybe our air is heavier and COVID falls to the ground more quickly.

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    1. Maybe we exhale with more power sending the little COVID bugs further.

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  5. We had a gorgeous spring day here, too. I'm lying on my bed with the window open, enjoying the mild breeze blowing in.

    Great pictures as always!

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    1. Lying on your bed waiting for Gregg to bring you your breakfast... "Hurry up honey!"

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    2. You forgot about the time difference. I was lying on the bed getting ready to go to sleep! NOW it's breakfast time. Which I'll be cooking, as always!

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    3. Oh yeah - the time difference - silly me!

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  6. That’s why your country is in this mess because no one follows the rules. Maybe they need to spell it out eg local is within a 5km radius from your home.

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    1. Actually most people follow most of the rules Curly Club but this one does not make sense. British people are traditionally very compliant when it comes to following official rules.

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  7. "Gorgeous" as a headline really fits this post perfectly! I love the picture with the stone wall most, of course.
    The rule to exercise locally does not help, does it. If everyone really did exercise in their own village or neighbourhood, too many would clog up the paths and roads there, making it very hard to keep the appropriate distance. If people can spread out in the countryside and fresh air, they won't get too close to each other so easily.

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    1. Exactly. My daughter said much the same thing yesterday Meike.

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  8. Beautiful photos of an empty landscape. You can always fund your fine on Patreon of course. As children we were told that fresh air was the best medicine for illness now it is a jab in the arm and a space.

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    1. I don't see any cops out and about but if they did stop me I would hang my head and say, "Very sorry your royal highness! I did not understand the law. Thank you for clarifying."

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  9. Excellent photos, as always, YP.
    Telecommunications mast - in the middle of such beautiful scenery? Why does man always seek to spoil paradise?

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    1. Because man is not man, he is donkey.

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  10. "You're Gorgeous by Sheffield band Babybird would be a good song to go with your excellent photos YP. Especially the drystone wall/style.

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    1. I knew you'd like the stonework Gorgeous Dave!

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    2. Stile even. I blame that Paul Weller and his Style Council.

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  11. When I saw the title for your post I thought you would be writing about your good lady wife, however, those those views are indeed gorgeous YP.

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    1. And that is a gorgeous comment you gorgeous creature!

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  12. I do not understand your laws. If you are socially distanced what does it matter where you walk? If you're outdoors by yourself arguing with no one but your car, it seems to me that you've minimized the risks. This week I am driving to the other side of our state. Our state has been in single digit new cases for several weeks now. My son had covid and recovered some weeks back. My daughter in law is a nurse so she's gotten both shots. I will drive straight there without stopping. Once there, I won't be leaving the house (everything I want to see is within their four walls). I will spend 6 days with Iris, who I've not seen in 7 months. I will hop in my car and drive straight home. I feel like I cannot eliminate the risks, but we've really gone into this thinking to minimize the risks as much as possible. All this in mind, I do not see how a walk in the country endangers anyone. Do they explain the rules?

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    1. Of course they do not explain the rules as "they" themselves break them. By the way, I think that Iris is a lovely name for a grand daughter - almost as lovely as Phoebe!

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    2. Omg. My COUNTY is in single digits...not the state. Our Iris is a rainbow baby. The healing balm to two crushed and broken hearts. She is our great joy. I never got to hold her brother. I have longed to see that little ray of sunshine.

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    3. Because Iris is a rainbow baby she will be loved and cherished all the more. And as for grandma making mistakes - no problem! Grandparents are aloud to do that.

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    4. The point of the local thing is that when people travel further distances they may stop to buy petrol, visit a public toilet or buy a drink at a cafe for example. Not everyone is as sensible as Yorkshire pudding.

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  13. I agree the "local" thing is ridiculously vague. In a place like London, what is "local"? Is it the whole city? Just my neighborhood? Where are the borders?

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    1. Coco the Clown Johnson can ride seven miles on his bike to The Olympic Park at Stratford so that must be a rule of thumb. Mind you Weasel Cummings travelled 250 miles and got away with it.

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  14. Looks like it was a beautiful day. My mum was English and her cure for most things was fresh air and a hot bath. Our dog park has been inundated and they've had to double the size of the car park.

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    1. I agree with your mum - even death itself can be avoided with fresh air and a hot bath.

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    2. Sadly a few years before she died she had to give up baths and use the shower. I am certain that speeded up her demise.

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    3. How sad that she could not follow her own advice towards the end of her life.

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  15. It is gorgeous, and that's all there is to it. The fact that you haven't been either stopped or questioned on your walks proves that these rules are more suggestion than law.

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    1. That has been part of the confusion - not knowing if it was mere guidance or actual hard-and-fast law.

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  16. I was just going to say exactly what Meike has already mentioned. So I shall keep quiet..ish!

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  17. Beautiful landscape. The other evening I was watching Ben Fogle revisit Ravenseat Farm near Richmond. It is stunning countryside although it must be grim in winter. I've always understood the term "local" with regard to the Covid regs as being within walking distance of your home. They did say a year ago that the reason was that if you have an accident on a bike or in a car it distracts the emergency services from dealing with the Covid cases. But I suppose walking distance varies from person to person. A little old granny might just make it to the end of her front path whereas a fit young or middle-aged person could walk miles and miles.

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    1. n all other respects I have stuck close to the guidance but for my mental and physical health I need to walk and a crowded city park just would not do. Johnson cycled at least seven miles to The Olympic Park and of course Cummings famously drove 250 miles for a birthday party so I do not feel bad about a five mile drive to Sir William Hill - on my own, not close to anybody else. There must be some common sense.

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