26 October 2020

Blogging

The Blogging Song

Of what shall we blog today my friend?

Of what shall we blog today?

We’ll blog of kings and the homeless too

Of oceans deep and skies so blue

Of dogs and frogs and flying things

The changing moods that winter brings

The way you feel when a cuckoo sings

Of that we shall blog today.

 

Of what shall we blog today my friend?

Of what shall we blog today?

We’ll blog of stuff seen on TV

Of threats to human liberty

Of dishes we’ve prepared to eat

The boots and shoes upon our feet

The president’s ordained defeat

Of that we shall blog today.

 

Of what shall we blog today my friend?

Of what shall we blog today?

We’ll blog of plants and blooming flowers

Of minutes that turn into hours

Of memory and days gone by

The hopeful sound of a baby’s cry

"The End" that comes on the day we die

Of that we shall blog today.

_______________________________________________________________________

Esteemed visitors to "Yorkshire Pudding" are cordially invited to create their own alternative verses.

34 comments:

  1. "I like blogging and I like to blog" . To the tune of Not The Nine oclock News "I like Trucking"..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just checked out the video for that. It seems quite sexist!

      Delete
  2. It was made in 1981. I will check it out.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It wasn't very hedgehog friendly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I cried when that little hedgehog got splatted.

      Delete
    2. Pamela Anderson/Stephenson did look amazing. Is that sexist?

      Delete
    3. I will have to contact the PC Bureau for a judgement on that.

      Delete
  4. But what are you going to blog about tomorrow?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorrow? Things I borrow? Marilyn Monroe? Bordeaux? See - they rhyme.

      Delete
  5. To blog or not to blog, now that IS the question.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hamlet thought just the same or as the late Spencer Davis might have sung..."Keep on Blogging"

      Delete
  6. I went on a virtual walk with my son yesterday by phone. He set off to the local park in Bath and I told him stories along the way of the history. But it is not blog 'interesting'. But blogs are like diaries, like the 'Housewife 49' series, they represent the daily events in our life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess that your son was using one of those new-fangled smartphones and showing you images of Bath as he strolled along. He could have easily walked into a tree! Ouch!

      Delete
  7. Who said anything about friendship, Sir Yorky? We are just your readers. Your job is to entertain us during lockdown. After it's over, we'll all get our Life back.

    Peter, Paul and Mary were managed by Albert Grossman. (See how nasty he was. An excerpt from the documentary film Don't Look Down, YouTube, when Dylan and his team were staying in a hotel in George Square, Glasgow.)

    Mary was vacationing in Florida. Grossman told her to stay out of the sun, because her image had to be Pale and Interesting. I'd call him a fox but foxes are born that way.

    I found a memoir in Oxfam Books by the great English Folk singer Shirley Collins, *America Over the Water*: published in the States in 2005. Shirley was an original before the image-makers took over.

    She writes about the great black and poor white Folk and Blues artists in Mississippi (good photos), men and women marginalised by American mass culture; and Parchman Farm (about which Mose Allison sang) the 20,000 acre prison farm in Old Missi, where many talented musicians were to be found.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure that many talented folk singers, musicians and writers were marginalised because of the colour of their skin. It was somehow easier to become known if you were Woody Guthrie or Tom Paxton and not the descendants of African slaves. And what of the songs of Native Americans? Where did they go?

      Delete
    2. There's always Buffy Sainte Marie -- she's Native American, and hit it pretty big in the '60s! I have her autobiography, which I haven't read yet. I'm sure it will be full of juicy tidbits about the likes of Albert Grossman.

      I love PP&M. Fantastic singers.

      Delete
    3. I saw Buffy Sainte Marie in concert in 1971 and had three of her albums. She was a force of Nature but her songs did not really come from Native American tradition.

      Delete
    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  8. Yes, where did the songs of Native Americans go? Dylan went to see Woodie Guthrie near the end of his life, and Woodie was in a forgotten place.

    In singing blues the Stones revived the fortunes of the great black artists, who started to get a few gigs again.
    The film *Paris Texas* written by Sam Sheperd and directed by Wim Wenders has a good blues track or two, I have the CD.

    Nobody knows the name of the black man in the South who was playing bottleneck on his guitar, sitting alone in a railway station. Was it Blind Lemon who heard it, a sound the likes of which he'd never heard before?
    And this was about 1908, before the First World War.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have never seen "Paris Texas". Your comment reminds me that I should make an effort to find it and watch it. As young folk say, "Thanks for the heads up John!"

      Delete
    2. Henry James wrote, *It is a complex fate to be an American.*

      Sam Shepherd, who the Pulitzer Prize and an Oscar, had a complex fate. The screen actor who wouldn't play Holywood's game. The playwright who wouldn't renounce his love of the Far West, even though the West is a ghost.

      America may have won the Cold War, but it lost the peace, and China is the future. Maybe Shepherd's screenplay *Paris Texas* is as much about all that as it is about two brothers, Dean Stockwell and Harry Dean Stanton, and Stanton's ex-wife, Natassja Kinski.

      It has a bottleneck blues score, ending with *Cold is the Ground.*
      Patti Smith has a Goodbye Forever piece in The New Yorker online:
      *My Buddy: Patti Smith Remembers Sam Sheperd.*

      Delete
    3. I keep writing Shepherd instead of Sheperd, an H too many.

      Somerset Maugham asked why we write *A* happy holiday but *An* historic novel. He had to remove all the redundant Hs when he rewrote his novel *Mrs Craddock*

      David Crystal will know: I am reading his book *How Language Works*, Penguin.

      Delete
  9. I cannot think of an alternative verse, yp. This is why I don't blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We all blog in our own way. I am sure that you would make a great blog Christina.

      Delete
  10. Well done YP. I have always loved Peter, Paul and Mary. The first album I ever got was one of theirs and I still have it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Their harmonies were magical and most of their songs had meaning. I am sure you already knew that they sang at the 1963 Freedom March on Washington.

      Delete
  11. Sorry to tell you, but I think I prefer the first version. You didn't sing this one either. If you sang it I may like it better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't understand Red. What do you mean by "the first version"?

      Delete
  12. What an unusual take of a song. I like that bit about "minutes that turn into hours" cos it has more meaning here where we are on partial lock down. My hours are turning into days and months!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just checked the current COVID figures for Malaysia. You have not been hit hard but I guess that caution is very wise.

      Delete
  13. I dunno. Today I'm more into figuring out alternative verses for "If I had a hammer..."
    I'm tired to death of American politics.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love that song Debby. It's spirit remains pertinent today.
      If I had a song
      I'd sing it in the morning
      I'd sing it in the evening
      All over this land
      I'd sing out danger
      I'd sing out a warning
      I'd sing out love between
      My brothers and my sisters
      All over this land, oh-oh-oh

      Delete
  14. Blogging is the modern equivalent to the diarist like samuel pepys. In years to come it will be a snapshot of life in the 1990s and Noughties. I wonder what future generations will make of us.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Suffering from herpes is a Terrible Experience which I suffered till I met a herbal doctor called Dr. KHAM. I tried all possible means to get cured but I never received cure from any of the 7 hospitals I visited.Just March,14,2018 I saw a recent post of how Dr. Kham herbal medicine cured people and that he is a honest man to work with in the procedures on finding a cure, then i contacted him in trial and he sent me a herbal medicine with the full prescription oh how to drink for two weeks and i exactly followed the guidelines that was given to me by DR. KHAM to cute the long story short the herbal medicine flushed out my whole system and make the herpes virus inactive all thanks to Dr. Kham who God is using to cure people of this terrible virus (herpes simplex virus) for anyone here that has herpes or other kinds of disease and Virus should mail all his or her complain to DR. KHAM on his email which is (dr.khamcaregiver@gmail.com) or whats app him on +2348159922297  and you can get in touch with him on his website:https://drkhamherbalhealingcenter.wordpress.com/   or https://drkhamcaregiver.wixsite.com/drkhamcaregiverherba   

    ReplyDelete

Mr Pudding welcomes all genuine comments - even those with which he disagrees. However, puerile or abusive comments from anonymous contributors will continue to be given the short shrift they deserve. Any spam comments that get through Google/Blogger defences will also be quickly deleted.

Most Visits